LumberJocks

Double Wedged/Bowtie Dowel

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Blog entry by Bud posted 09-04-2009 07:03 AM 3246 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

No glue.

Long story short – no glue joint…pretty cool.

-- http://www.schoolisfortools.blogspot.com/



6 comments so far

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

913 posts in 2038 days


#1 posted 09-04-2009 07:28 AM

If I ever do find the need to use dowels for joinery, with this joint I know it will last with no chance of glue failure. I don’t know if you invented it but I’ve never seen a double wedged dowel like this. It looks like it would work just as well with a loose tenon wouldn’t it? Thanks for sharing.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2118 days


#2 posted 09-04-2009 02:38 PM

although i havent used them yet, i like the idea of using dowels for joinery – especially for drawers instead of dovetails. the issue with dowels is really in the different rates of wood movement for each grain orientation when joining crossing grains. i think there’s an old article in FWW that describes this.

anyway, this seems to be a good solution. how did you wedge the hidden end?

this is sort of like the tenon lok system, but smaller and double-sided. nice!

View Bud's profile

Bud

45 posts in 1939 days


#3 posted 09-04-2009 05:49 PM

Split the hidden end of the dowel with a chisel, partially insert the hidden wedge, drop it into the hole and drive it home. Then split the show end, insert wedge and go crazy with your favorite hammer.

-- http://www.schoolisfortools.blogspot.com/

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2118 days


#4 posted 09-04-2009 06:26 PM

oh, that makes too much sense. thanks!

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1002 posts in 2140 days


#5 posted 09-05-2009 01:29 AM

i think the right use of dowels can make a beautiful piece of work. one suggestion is to drill a small relief hole in the dowel and then saw from the show end to the hole. you can use a thin kerf bandsaw or a flush cut hand saw. at least that’s how a typical wedge tendon works. one other item. if the wood dries out any at all, the wedge will loosen. a stop of glue will cure that.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View mjlauro's profile

mjlauro

244 posts in 2415 days


#6 posted 09-05-2009 04:15 AM

Genius, I’ll def try it when the need arrises.

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