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Laundry Room Floor Cabinet #1: Episode One

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Blog entry by Eric posted 12-31-2011 03:58 AM 1273 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Laundry Room Floor Cabinet series Part 2: Episode Two »

For about a year now, I’ve been interested in trying my hand at building a cabinet. This summer (2011) while moving things around in the laundry room we discovered the particleboard floor cabinet in this room was beginning to crumble.

My answer…

Make another from particle board!!! Sorry LJs. Its my first cabinet. I’m not going to shed the bucks for a sheet of 3/4” 11-ply baltic birch on my first attempt. However, I did want to work with prefinished sheet goods for the first time. I decided to go with a 3/4” melamine skinned with Norwegian Maple.

I quickly built the carcass.

I was pretty happy with the tight jointery.

I have made faceframes before so I went right to the solid maple to build the actual faceframe with pocket screw joints. (Seen below)

Many weeks passed as I was shopping for the right cabinet-maker’s router bit set for the doors. My generic bits finally arrived in the mail. I first made a prototype out of pine. I’m using most of the same dimensions as the cabinet I am replacing… however, when building the door, I forgot I widened the cabinet by 1 inch. See the skinny little door below. Oh well. That’s what prototypes are for right?

Next I begin the actual door stiles and rails out of solid maple. Here I learned a little bit about snipe on my router table. One set of opposing joints are open

while the other pair of opposing joints are tight.

My router table fence is one single piece for the in-feed and the out-feed. I was able to fix this on the second door by clamping a single lining of cardboard (cut from a Eggos box) to the fence on the out-feed side of the bit. This prevented the work piece from falling into the bit as the tail of the work piece left the in-feed fence.

Since this is for a laundry room, I might just wood fill the crack. On the brighter side, my measuring paid off in the long run as both doors meet perfectly in the middle with a 1/32” gap covering the wider faceframe.

-- Eric



3 comments so far

View Mike R.'s profile

Mike R.

184 posts in 1303 days


#1 posted 12-31-2011 04:40 AM

Looking good, I have to do the same for a linnen closet when I get back from deployment

View Paul Stoops's profile

Paul Stoops

322 posts in 1219 days


#2 posted 12-31-2011 05:42 AM

Looks like you are doing a good job. It should look great when finished.
I understand your logic about not wanting to buy expensive plywood, but I think I would have opted to go to one of the BORG stores (HD, Lowes, etc.) and purchased a small precut panel for the bottom of the cabinet, which is the most susceptible to water damage. Particle board doesn’t like water! Or maybe it does—and therein lyeth the problem! Those precut panels are usually available in 2’x2’, 2’x4’, 4’x4’, etc. They are more expensive per sq. ft. than a whole sheet of the same material, but for a one off use, it might make some sense.

-- Paul, Auburn, WA

View Eric's profile

Eric

185 posts in 1169 days


#3 posted 12-31-2011 07:16 AM

I hear ya Paul. If this were an upper, it’d be ply for sure. My next bottom cabinet will be ply as well, after I “prove” myself with this first one. Thanks for looking.

-- Eric

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