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42 #6: Late as in the late Dent, Arthur Dent

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 03-31-2012 12:16 PM 1982 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Disaster Area Part 6 of 42 series Part 7: So long and thanks for all the fish »

Its supposed to be a threat, I was never any good at those.- Slartibartfast

Well I am. This method is not working.

1.

The small (1mm square x 6mm long) piece that retains the hinge pin falls out. Remember I have used CA (superglue) on these.

2.

On the ‘grain following’ rear/top hinge 1mm is too thin to hold. I could re-enforce with a 0.5mm piece, cross grained to this but problem 1. still remains.

This means the end of this attempt at 3mm thick wooden hinges…....................

..............and the start of another!

I now realise I should have stuck with the clam-shell method I blogged for ‘56’. At this scale the structure of wood cells in the timber may have more reliable adhesion than CA on a surface where cells of timber may be opposite holes between them on the surfaces you are trying to glue. CA is not a good gap filler, in my experience.

I’ve had some good input from fellow LJ’s, particularly ‘scrollgirl’ (Sheila). Why not use a scrollsaw to cut the fingers? Good point. I started experimenting, pulling out the scroll saw, kicking and screaming, from it’s lair, in the cupboard under the planer. Bolted it down to the bench (yes the ‘work’ bench, the one with holes in to attach tools to).

Using one of the spare 1mm pieces for the last attempt I re-assessed my scrolling skill by trying to see if I could produce repeatable cuts. (Scale in mm)

fine by me. I marked out some fingers and cut them

Pretty good, I think. Thats it then. The project re-commences. It will pretty much follow the lines of the Clam-Shell Hinge blog so I’ll mostly be posting progress pictures, picking out modifications to technique as and when.

Be seeing you.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



20 comments so far

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1691 days


#1 posted 03-31-2012 12:21 PM

The hinges will still be 3mm thick (2×1.5mm this time), Walnut and Sycamore.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View jaykaypur's profile

jaykaypur

3350 posts in 1063 days


#2 posted 03-31-2012 12:24 PM

Looks like you are underway …...........again!

Patience. patience, patience.

-- Use it up, Wear it out --------------- Make it do, Or do without!

View patron's profile

patron

13034 posts in 1996 days


#3 posted 03-31-2012 12:28 PM

good save martyn

at this rate
you will be working
with an electron microscope
and a laser saw soon

with a USB cable in your ear

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1691 days


#4 posted 03-31-2012 12:32 PM

Lets see, David. Borg or Robocop? Decisions, decisions.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4813 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 03-31-2012 12:46 PM

I had kinda thought about that insert being so small. And you are right, CA will not fill a gap. Epoxy will, but that enters another whole set of problems.

Will be interested in the scroll saw venture. Love your work.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View jeepturner's profile

jeepturner

920 posts in 1448 days


#6 posted 03-31-2012 02:04 PM

Just asking Martyn, because I am curious. Why not use the router table to cut the fingers?
Maybe I am missing something in this,

-- Mel,

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1691 days


#7 posted 03-31-2012 02:28 PM

Mel. These are very thin pieces of wood. Whilst I would keep them sandwiched between two layers of MDF when routing there is still no guarantee that they would not split, especially the grain following rear/top hinge fingers. The scroll saw causes minimal stress and therefore no risk of splitting.

In addition it took less than one hour to get from this

to this

The scroll saw also allows for minute changes in the hinge finger fit, with instantaneous feedback, without lengthy adjustment procedures and a wait to see if it will or not split as it could using a router bit.

Incidentally here’s where I do all my last minute planning.

Next stage is to route the pin groove (not a through cut and, as its a vee cut, not so disruptive to the wood). Now that should be fun. Obviously a definition of the word fun I was previously unaware of but fun nonetheless.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View jeepturner's profile

jeepturner

920 posts in 1448 days


#8 posted 03-31-2012 02:32 PM

Wow, that is a lot of work done in just one hour.
I think the white board in the shop is right up there with the most brilliant ideas you have shared. Now I need to go out to the shop and look at wall space.
Thanks Martyn!

-- Mel,

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1691 days


#9 posted 03-31-2012 02:51 PM

Incidentally I took great pleasure in treading on the first version of the box. The pics of it are all that’s left.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#10 posted 03-31-2012 04:09 PM

Happy to see you progressing. Learning is always part of the game for all of us. I had to smile with your last comment. There is something satisfactory about ‘disposing of’ our errors in a creative way. Works wonders for stress relief!

Carry on! :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View stefang's profile

stefang

13043 posts in 1989 days


#11 posted 03-31-2012 05:15 PM

You are on the right track now Martyn, looks very good. Scroll saws are the perfect machines to do box joint type cuts.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2339 days


#12 posted 03-31-2012 08:03 PM

persistence…. like a rottweiler. this looks like it might work. my last (second hand, bad quality) scrollsaw had so much vibrations and drift that i guess i would get perfect dovetails from trying to cut finger joints :-)

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2908 posts in 2157 days


#13 posted 03-31-2012 08:58 PM

Hey!! What a GREAT IDEA!! :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View Druid's profile

Druid

618 posts in 1451 days


#14 posted 03-31-2012 09:40 PM

I’m staying tuned. The final outcome should be worth it.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#15 posted 03-31-2012 09:44 PM

Yep, Moshel – a crummy scroll saw can make all the difference. You don’t have to get a top of the line one to do a good job, but if you get a cheap one it is usually an unruly beast and leave a bad taste for scolling at all in your mouth. It is really useful for lots of other applications like this too. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

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