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Inverted World #4: All Together now

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 07-10-2011 07:02 PM 1829 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Cutting Curves Part 4 of Inverted World series Part 5: Trim and Cleanup »

I left you with all the pattern pieces, their curved sides routed, and no idea of how I was going to square up the straight edges. Well I had a beer and a little think and came up with

At the bottom of the picture you see the pattern diagram again. In order to re-establish where the straight edges of the pattern should I first masking taped the pattern pieces together

then I took a pair of compasses and using the central point ‘0’ drew an arc ‘1’ out to the tip of the pattern. Moved the compasses point to the (middle of) where the arc cut the tip and drew arcs ‘2’. Moving the point back to zero I drew arcs ‘3’ to intersect. Using this intersection for the compasses point I drew arcs ‘4’. Then I joined up the intersection points so

I sanded off the excess, checking for squareness, on my disc sander. Giving this

Using the router template and some chipboard offcuts I made up some clamping jaws and glued and clamped all the pieces up.

The wadded paper towel was used to soak up any irregularities in the jaws.

When this was dry I had the half pattern so

I doubled sided taped the clamping jaws back on, for support (mainly of the pattern tips) and re-sawed the pattern into two on the table saw.

Removing the clamp pieces I then marked out the Padauk edge pieces to suit

I was going to rough cut them on the band saw and the true them up using the router template.

However I am happy to say my band-sawing accuracy has improved, through practice, to the extent where I used the cuts as they were for a first fix line up of the board so

I sanded the round edges on the Padauk smooth and took out any irregularities on the disk sander and glued the whole issue up.

There it sits waiting to dry. The next step is to trim and thickness sand the board but thats for next time. Work tomorrow so no beer today. Cup of tea instead. I think I’ve eared it.

Be seeing you.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



11 comments so far

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4827 posts in 2549 days


#1 posted 07-10-2011 07:14 PM

Nice. Man, that is precise work. Congrats on it coming together.

The grain in the center of the padauk is going to add a nice touch. I love wood.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View fernandoindia's profile

fernandoindia

1073 posts in 1610 days


#2 posted 07-10-2011 09:14 PM

Coming out great Martyn.

Wood combination looks even better than in your first drawing.

You are almost there now.

Thank you for sharing patience,
knowledge, determination, and your
obsession

-- Back home. Fernando

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7692 posts in 1587 days


#3 posted 07-11-2011 12:39 AM

That is looking great! I admire your bravery in re-sawing on the table saw. I would have been so scared to do that. It is coming out so nice, though. You really have a huge amount of patience.

Sheila :)

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View LittlePaw's profile

LittlePaw

1571 posts in 1745 days


#4 posted 07-11-2011 02:29 AM

Very interesting indeed!!! I don’t really trust my band sawing to attempt that. I would need to come up with a template to cut the curves. It’s coming together nicely.

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

View JL7's profile

JL7

7224 posts in 1632 days


#5 posted 07-11-2011 02:40 AM

Hey Martyn – this is really incredible stuff – agree with littlepaw, I couldn’t band saw anything that good…amazing. And – no amount of beers will give me the cool vision you have with these boxes…thanks for sharing.

Jeff

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View rance's profile

rance

4135 posts in 1827 days


#6 posted 07-11-2011 03:17 AM

This is all VERY intriguing to me. I’m always fascinated by the techniques used to get the results for pieces suches as this. I think I enjoy that part of WW more than anything, just figuring out the engineering to get to where I want to be. I’m always looking at easier ways to do things too.

Thanks for sharing, posting, and inspiring us.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1589 days


#7 posted 07-11-2011 06:35 AM

All been said, and I can say I am really challenge about the curves handling. A very interesting lesson.
Just a question…. Pivot radius during routing is dependent on the drawing itself or was there a certain ratio that you had used. Using sketchup.. I found a double square inscribed diagonally will do the trick.. I just want to confirm because the arc on my sketchup seems to be shortened. Thanks Martyn.

-- Bert

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1589 days


#8 posted 07-11-2011 06:40 AM

Another secret revealed in your cutting of the board in the bandsaw … I think a brad or nail is inverted fitted as your center for cutting the arc and corresponding pinhole on your sawbed. I do this trick on my rainbow box but it was upright and not inverted. Thanks for the pictures.. they are so clear that you can see the techniques with a little thinking.

-- Bert

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3087 posts in 1601 days


#9 posted 07-11-2011 07:42 AM

Another great blog!

The box is going to be great.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4378 posts in 1703 days


#10 posted 07-11-2011 02:38 PM

Bert, its like this.

The pivot point for the arcs are at the corners of the largest square. The first arc is drawn to the midpoint of the outside square edge. The second arc from the corner at the other end of the line to the intersection of the first arc and the inside square. The straight lines are diagonals of the smaller square.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1589 days


#11 posted 07-12-2011 02:47 AM

Thanks Martyn, you really make my life easy.

-- Bert

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