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Xee - construction

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 11-14-2010 05:55 PM 1697 reads 6 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Xee is the third in the series of my EZ mitred boxes. There are one or two wrinkles to this one so I’m blogging those bits here.

Firstly in order to achieve continuity of pattern over the whole box it was essential to make this a veneered box. Until such time as they come up with a zero kerf sawblade or a knife that can cut through several millimetres of wood the seperation cut for the box top causes an unacceptable step in the pattern if solid wood were used. The veneer at 0.6mm is thin enough to get around this. Here is a picture of the board that the box is made from
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This is effectively a net for the box with corners added (later to be removed) that make the board easier to cut.
The red lines are sapele veneer introduced to the pattern where the box separation cut will be made.

What to use for the baseboard for this veneered box? MDF is the most stable substrate currently available. It has a downside though. When you seperate the box there would be a bare MDF edge visible. ‘Veneer that’ I hear you say. That would lead to a 1.2mm gap in the pattern (0.6mm veneer on both box top and bottom edge) defeating the object of not stepping the pattern. To get over this I introduce a strip of hardwood into the base board where the seperation cut will occur, thus
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This face will be the inside of the box (called reverse for now).You will note the rebate, used to house location lipping at a later stage. When the box separation cut is made the edge visible will be this hardwood, in this case Walnut.

Next major problem is how to register the design properly. No I’m not suggesting you have to sign all your worldly possessions, your children and children’s children away to the Microsoft Corporation, as is the case when registering their software. In this case registering means aligning the outside pattern (seen in the first pic) accurately with respect to the base board ( and the above hardwood strips).

To do this I layered three boards, two of 12mm MDF and on top the base board. I had marked two hole centres at diagonal opposites on the base board, each 140mm from the exact centre of where the pattern will go. Total separation 280mm. Clamped the three together and at the hole centres drilled all the way through with a 6mm drill. I the bottom 12mm board I located two 6mm dowels. I then overbored the holes in the other two boards by 0.5mm in order that they could easily slip over the dowels and also be easily removed after gluing the veneer patterns to the base board, whilst still being a reasonably accurate fit. Here are the two outside 12mm boards (registration plates)
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On the veneer patterns for the outside
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I marked the same locations and cut out a 6.5mm square hole at each. It doesn’t have to be round, just the same dimensions across as the hole in the base board. This was also done on the reverse pattern.
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It is now a simple matter to slip the reverse pattern over the dowels of the bottom registration plate. Apply glue to the reverse of the base board, slip that over the dowels. Apply glue to the front side of the base board, slip the front (outside of box) pattern and then the second registration plate over the dowels and clamp the wole issue in a suitable veneer clamp
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until the glue is dry. You then just trim off the excess from around the resulting board and you are back here
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From there you need to go to the EZ Mitre blog, here, to complete the job.

Hope thats all fairly clear. If not please ask.

Be seeing you

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



10 comments so far

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4359 posts in 1674 days


#1 posted 11-14-2010 06:02 PM

Please note in this case, with a box of height of 58mm, that the distance set for cutting the mitres in the EZ mitre blog would be 58 + Saw Kerf width = 60 mm in my case (with a 2mm kerf blade)

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1727 days


#2 posted 11-14-2010 06:37 PM

Hi Martyn,
One of these days I will get to making one of your wonderful boxes.
Thank you for the new parts of the tecnique.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4942 posts in 1436 days


#3 posted 11-14-2010 07:03 PM

Again Martyn, Very nice and well thought out solution.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1416 posts in 2134 days


#4 posted 11-14-2010 07:17 PM

Wow, great instructions Martyn, makes it look simple…. LOL

You’re work is absolutely amazing and so precise. I, like mafe, may one day attempt one of your boxes. It would be so much fun !

Thanks for taking the time to do this.

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View sras's profile

sras

3821 posts in 1767 days


#5 posted 11-14-2010 09:07 PM

Hi Martyn,
Thanks for posting these blogs – they really spark my imagination. Hopefully someday I can try this myself.

It occurs to me that you might be able to provide a lip without sacrificing any saw kerf allowance. If you created another pair of 45 degree cuts along the break line for the lid you could then separate the box along that line after assembly. Now your lid and box have a sharp fragile edge where they meet.

The lip for the lid and the box could be created in the cavity created by the cuts. When I sketch it out, it looks like you might have to offest the lip to the inside of the box to create continuous pieces. Another option would be to create a groove to give more room for the lip parts.

Now you could install these two pieces before you break the lid off (more likely cut with a knife). This would take some measures to ensure glue only goes where you want – this seems a little tricky since you don’t want any thickness there. Maybe a slingle layer of tape. Or glue these pieces in after separating the lid.

It’s kind of tricky to describe this verbally – if you woud like, maybe I can sketch something up.

On the other hand, it might not be that good of an idea! It could be that it does not hold up when put to practice…

Steve

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4359 posts in 1674 days


#6 posted 11-14-2010 09:53 PM

Steve, a sketch would be appreciated. From what you have described I see a triangular lipping piece being inserted. Is this correct?

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View sras's profile

sras

3821 posts in 1767 days


#7 posted 11-14-2010 11:00 PM

Basically – let me see if I can create a simple view …

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View sras's profile

sras

3821 posts in 1767 days


#8 posted 11-14-2010 11:16 PM

Here is a sketch

The Blue lines are glued and the Red ones are not glued. The one on the left uses only the vee cut and the one on the right adds the groove.

Seems to me the challenges are small pieces that need to be held in place accurately and keeping the red joints glue free. The version on the right allows for some bigger pieces that may hold position better…

Well, it’s an idea at least – you can decide if it’s a good one!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4800 posts in 2520 days


#9 posted 11-15-2010 12:10 AM

Very nice Martyn. Nice and methodical.
That took a fair amount of planning, and you carried that out well.

I am duly impressed,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4359 posts in 1674 days


#10 posted 11-15-2010 10:25 PM

Sras, I’ll give it some thought. First impression is that the one one the left would be easier to manufacture. Red joints can be kept glue free by waxing. I might try some prototyping to check it out, thanks.

Indeed thank you all for sitting through another of my brain-storms.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

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