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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 09-15-2010 09:28 PM 1479 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



14 comments so far

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4419 posts in 1753 days


#1 posted 09-15-2010 09:29 PM

ps I’m not trying to insult anyone’s intelligence here. Just pass on something that might be useful.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2365 days


#2 posted 09-15-2010 09:33 PM

looks good, but for safety issues,I’d like to have the area in front of the blade as large as possible. you can also use a sheet of masonite (hardboard) and rip it until it covers the table while the fence is positioned for your additional rip cuts – install the splitter, and you have a full sleek surface to rip on top of.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4419 posts in 1753 days


#3 posted 09-15-2010 09:36 PM

Good point, Sharon. Covering the full depth of the table is advisable.

Masonite (hardboard) is generally only available in 3mm (1/8”) sheets in the UK (far too thin to attach a riving knife or splitter into and expect it to stand upright for long), hence the reference to using, thicker, MDF.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2365 days


#4 posted 09-15-2010 09:57 PM

agreed. thicker material would make it easier to wedge something in.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View William's profile

William

9206 posts in 1559 days


#5 posted 09-15-2010 10:06 PM

I cut various table inserts for my saw out of MDF. I have a zero clearance, dado, etc. I cut them to fit into the hole of the stock insert with a scroll saw. Just trace the stock insert onto the wood and cut. Sand as needed to fit. Then I planed it down to be flush with the table.
Another issue is lowering the insert over the blade to cut the slot for said blade. I use to do it this way. Then I had a very close call and was scared to do it that way. It takes a lot to rattle me, but this scared the snot out of me. Now, I let my blade all the way down into the table. Put the insert in place. Turn the saw on. Use a scrap piece of wood to hold the insert down so it doesn’t try to rise upwards. Then turn the saw on and slowly raise it up though the insert. I’ve never had any problems doing it this way and feel it is much safer.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2365 days


#6 posted 09-15-2010 10:10 PM

William – I agree with you on making ZCI for western saws – but if you’ll notice, Martyns saw doesn’t have a factory insert that can be replaced, which is why he suggested the topper-zero clearance concept.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View William's profile

William

9206 posts in 1559 days


#7 posted 09-15-2010 10:15 PM

I forgot to mention the riving knife. This may not work on all saws. Mine is a Rigid 3650. Making the insert the way I do on my saw, it is still thick enough (about 1/2”) to put in a riving knife the way you showed. I also have one made that way. I have one thin blade I use when very seldom, but when I do, I had to make a riving knife like you because my stock knife was too thick. Actually, the thickness of my riving knife is exactly why I don’t care for thin blades much. I like my stock knife with the anti-kickback pawls on it. Also, my safety sheild is attached to the stock riving knife.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9206 posts in 1559 days


#8 posted 09-15-2010 10:19 PM

I’m sorry. I thought that round piece lifted out like my factory insert. If it doesn’t, then I can see why you’d do it as he’s described. If possible, I’d still suggest raising the running blade up instead of lowering the wood over a moving blades for safery reasons, if this is possible.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2365 days


#9 posted 09-15-2010 10:24 PM

I’ll second the raising of the blade as well. although since you are partially ripping the (somewhat) thick MDF, and wedging a splitter behind the blade – I don’t even see a need to lower the panel ,nor raise the blade. Just set the blade to rip through the MDF but instead of a full through rip, stop in the middle. stop saw, wedge splitter. done deal.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4419 posts in 1753 days


#10 posted 09-15-2010 10:31 PM

I agree with you both, there are many ways to acheive the end result.

This method works for me.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2365 days


#11 posted 09-15-2010 10:34 PM

no offense Martyn, was just thinking out loud. :)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4419 posts in 1753 days


#12 posted 09-15-2010 10:38 PM

No offense taken, Sharon. Your points are valid and present people with alternate methods which they may find more acceptable. Just being factual.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1831 days


#13 posted 09-15-2010 11:11 PM

thank´s for the tip Martyn

Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9595 posts in 1805 days


#14 posted 09-15-2010 11:31 PM

Hi Martyn,
Thats clever, and I’m happy not insulted, did not know this little trick.
I can use this tip on my tablesaw, and was annoyed I could not make a zero clearens for it.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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