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Jigs etc. #2: The old 60°

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 1446 days ago 1766 reads 10 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Mitre Jigs Part 2 of Jigs etc. series Part 3: Simple Circle Cutting Jig for the Routing Table »

Some of you have been wondering how I finish pieces to exactly 60° for my Impossible series. Basically I cut them to 60° on the tablesaw, a little oversize (experiment) and then finish sand them on the drum sander using this Jig. It works equally well on a planer/thicknesser.

Fairly simple to make. You take a rectangular section of timber (lumber). Shorter in thickness than the width of the piece you are planing/sanding. Set your tablesaw blade to precisely 60°. I use a vernier protractor these days but the kind of set square you find in a school geometry set works almost as well. Saw through the length roughly in the centre of the wood.

Flip one piece 180° lengthways, so that they both have their larger end downward.

And screw them to a piece of MDF. The next bit is very important. Attach an end stop at one end to prevent the timber you are planing/sanding from shooting back and hitting you in the gut (or worse). Like so

Its painful. I speak from experience. This end will obviously be the one closest to you and the back end as the work goes through your machine. Thats it. Just place the thing to be machined to 60° in it and plane/sand.

As my friend from comparethemeerkat.com would say ‘Simples!’

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



11 comments so far

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7554 posts in 1544 days


#1 posted 1446 days ago

This is so cool! Isn’t is wonderful when something so simple can make things so much better? What a great tool Martyn. It is great for you to share it with everyone!

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4783 posts in 2506 days


#2 posted 1446 days ago

Sweet. Simple enough. I like it.

Someone ought to perform a comparison of a rotating power tool ejecting a piece of wood with a trebuchet, and see which will throw it farther.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View blockhead's profile

blockhead

1451 posts in 1932 days


#3 posted 1445 days ago

A nice simple solution Martyn. Thanks for sharing!

Steve- I like that idea!

-- Brad, Oregon- The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1546 days


#4 posted 1445 days ago

Martyn,
Thanks for the idea of this jig, I tried this one with trapezoidal at 95 degrees and 85 degrees angle (yours 60 deg.) but I was not so sucessful. I just planed it manually which is more tiring and adjusted it with a filing, Your idea had put a light on my next move when I do the rectangular design. Now, I have already realized how really difficult those projects you do. A little mistake will let you do it again. In fact, I am very selective now with the wood I used. Endgrain cuts can easily breaks when cutting it to shape. Thanks for postiing your jigs.
Cheers,

-- Bert

View patron's profile

patron

13000 posts in 1965 days


#5 posted 1445 days ago

AH !

RIG – A – JIG

this one is right up there

with

SOAP – ON – A – ROPE

a classic for sure

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mafe's profile

mafe

9482 posts in 1713 days


#6 posted 1445 days ago

Simplicity are the key, you opened the door.
Really nice and simple solution.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4352 posts in 1660 days


#7 posted 1445 days ago

I am the stupid in KISS (keep it simple stupid)

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View RonPeters's profile

RonPeters

708 posts in 1504 days


#8 posted 1445 days ago

Cost to do the repair $300…

$1 for the part…

$299 for knowing how to do it…!

-- “Once more unto the breach, dear friends...” Henry V - Act III, Scene I

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4352 posts in 1660 days


#9 posted 1445 days ago

?!

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4352 posts in 1660 days


#10 posted 1444 days ago

Thanks Dennis I get the joke, now. Doh!

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View lumberdustjohn's profile

lumberdustjohn

1248 posts in 1790 days


#11 posted 1443 days ago

Thanks for the post.
I will try this soon

-- Safety first because someone needs you.

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