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Snakes Pattern in Solid Wood #2: Puzzling

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 05-31-2010 12:28 PM 4128 reads 4 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Challenge of the Snakes Part 2 of Snakes Pattern in Solid Wood series Part 3: Preparation or Going for the Big One. »

Hello again. The glue-up went well. So did the cleanup and sizing of the smaller squares. So I decided to try a dry run of a patch of the snakes pattern. Sawed up 1/6th of my stock netting 15 large squares and 14 small (7 x walnut, 7 x maple). Played around a bit and this is the result.

Some of the maple wasn’t the lightest in the world and I hope the contrast holds when its finished.
Patterns in the layout have emerged which should make things easier come glue-up time, such as every large square having dark or light triangles going in the same direction and the small squares alternating light and dark. Looks like it will be a rectangular glue-up with a minimal loss of pattern at the edges. Fingers crossed. Its a holiday here today so I’m off to do some more. See ya.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



17 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

13034 posts in 1997 days


#1 posted 05-31-2010 12:56 PM

hi martyn ,
another interesting ,
‘play on woods’ .
in my carrier as a woodworker ,
when i did these things ,
the other carpenters ,
told me to quit ‘playing around’ ,
and get back to serious woodworking !

glad to see we are not alone ,
maybe we have finally found and asylum ,
we can all enjoy ?
i like ,
but then again ,
i like my thorazine too !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 2020 days


#2 posted 05-31-2010 01:09 PM

Neat Martyn, Tough to see from the picture, I imagine the grain direction on all the Maple snake pieces will have to move in the snake direction or the visual illusion will be lost.

Edit: Nice illusion I just noticed that the walnut piece will be snakes also. So grain direction in the entire piece will be crucial to make the snakes come to life.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View degoose's profile

degoose

7013 posts in 2010 days


#3 posted 05-31-2010 01:43 PM

Grain orientation is always critical in differentiating between good and great.. I think this will work reasonably well.. even with the dark maple…
Still playing with my ideas… maybe this week… I think I can make it using silver ash and purple heart…??

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1692 days


#4 posted 05-31-2010 02:44 PM

Larry and Scott, you guys are experts at this and I greatly appreciate your comments. Grain orientation is more important than I had anticipated. Not to mention gluing over 140 pieces at the same time. I forsee some form of clamping frame for the glue-up and a lot of hard work orientating grain directions first.

Just paying attention to pattern and not looking at where the grain went it took me over an hour to put all the pieces together. I am sure you two can think of a more bullet proof method of doing this. In patterns I usually split it down into rows but I couldn’t see a repeat if I did that for this one.

Then again making cutting boards is not my area of specialty (and it IS an area of specialty as I am discovering) I have probably bitten off more than I can chew and if I get my arse bitten then all the better. I will have learnt something and friends like Cozmo will be able to see my human side.

I think I would have been better off doing it as a box top! Humble pie is not my favourite dish but it looks like I’ll have to develop a taste for it. Serves me right.

I’m off back to the asylum (workshop), David.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4817 posts in 2538 days


#5 posted 05-31-2010 03:11 PM

Yikes, that’s going to be one heck of a glue up. Gotta use the right glue for cutting board water resistance, and the right glue for slow set-up time. And a heck of a frame for building it in.

Leveling the top with your new sander is the easy part.

Good luck,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1642 days


#6 posted 05-31-2010 05:17 PM

wow. that’s crazy. it’s going to be amazing in the end, for sure!

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112096 posts in 2233 days


#7 posted 05-31-2010 05:20 PM

Looks super Martyn

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1692 days


#8 posted 05-31-2010 06:21 PM

Right. I’ve trimmed the odd bits off. Made up a sanding (later to be clamping) frame and sanded the lot flat (still un-glued) and given it a skim coat of sealer (as I feared oil would defeat the glue at glue-up time). All this done to enable me to sort the light maple from the dark and to try to align grain patterns. This is what it looks like before I sort out the variations.

I’ll accept ‘good’, as defined by Larry, if the grain orientation isn’t perfect when I’m finished as this is only a test piece to prove the pattern is acheivable in solid wood as opposed to veneer.

I believe I also have a solution to the glue-up quandry. I may fail, I aim to succeed.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 2020 days


#9 posted 05-31-2010 10:45 PM

The Pattern is awesome. Glue up formula should be the basic two fixed sides with two moving cull sides, slowly squeeze each way. Maybe try to group the brown maple pieces together in a area, like from right corner out until all the pieces turn white.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4370 posts in 1692 days


#10 posted 05-31-2010 11:04 PM

Great minds think alike, Scott. I’ll remove the screws from two adjacent sides and use them as the floating cauls.

Only thing I’m concerned about is the working time of the glue I’m using, Titebond III. I was thinking of doing the glue-up in about four or five sections. Adding another couple of rows at a time. What do you think?

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Mary Anne's profile

Mary Anne

1057 posts in 1864 days


#11 posted 05-31-2010 11:14 PM

You are an expert at turning small bits into large pretty things. Your pattern making tutorials are, at last, making the bulb go off in my mind. It may be a dim bulb, but I am catching on to the process. Thanks… I hope. :)

View stefang's profile

stefang

13046 posts in 1990 days


#12 posted 06-01-2010 12:32 AM

Way beyond me, but very interesting to see this great work. I’m afraid to even try this stuff.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View sras's profile

sras

3841 posts in 1785 days


#13 posted 06-01-2010 02:21 AM

I’m still impressed with how you were able to see how to make the pattern with two basic elements! Thanks for sharing!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View woodpeckerbill's profile

woodpeckerbill

202 posts in 1929 days


#14 posted 06-01-2010 03:41 AM

Wow! Great design.
Bill

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 2020 days


#15 posted 06-01-2010 04:31 AM

Martyn, I missed how large this is.
I’ve spent up to 15 min from start to finish on a board. My thought has been the more glue the longer the drying time or time to set up. So I initially put the glue on heavier especially in the beginning. Also you will be setting these neatly and tightly in place against your fixed culls so there will not be a lot of messing around with it, just tighten the clamps. I take a dish pour out the glue so it’s handy and go for it. Once you are into the meat of the board you will only need to coat two sides of each piece so It should go fairly quickly. It looks like a lot of pieces, the fewer sections however the better and less chance of a section not lining up right in the final stage of glue up.
Good Luck.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

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