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Drum Sander #3: Zen and the art of Bandsaw Drum part making.

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Blog entry by BritBoxmaker posted 05-15-2010 05:38 PM 2013 reads 4 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Fixing a hole Part 3 of Drum Sander series Part 4: Pause for thought »

Looking back I really don’t know what I was worried about. I fettled the bandsaw, with a 1/4” blade installed, and set up the jig fairly easily.

Set up some relaxing music on my MP3 player, Beethoven – Pastoral symphony, and set about making MDF donuts (yes I can also speak American).


What with the music, the steady progress and the way each little corner would tap, tap, tap against the donut just before it was about to fall off I settled into what I can only assume is a Zen state of peaceful happiness. Before I knew it I had 20 close fitting donuts on the drum spindle

This done I sized and trimmed the Table and gave it a nice coat of Organoil

Next thing to do was glue up the drum. Surprisingly easy. The design says epoxy the discs to the shaft and each other. Not me. Yes I used Epoxy twixt disc and shaft but why waste it, its relatively expensive, I used a coat of Titebond III between the discs. I scored up the disc faces with 80 grit before I started the gluing process. MDF can be a real b*gger to stick if you leave it ‘au naturale’. When finished I clamped it up

and thats where I’ve left things for today. More in the next episode.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com



11 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2085 days


#1 posted 05-15-2010 06:34 PM

You are making this seem so simple Martyn that I’m tempted to give it a go myself soon. Everything is looking nice and neat. I had to chuckle a little at the edging on the table. I am also excessive with screws once I get started. It’s good to know I’m not alone. I’m really looking forward to it’s completion. It seems everyone who has built one of similar design seems very pleased with it. I’m not sure I need one, but I JUST WANT ONE and among woodworkers that is usually reason enough. Waiting patiently for the next chapter.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#2 posted 05-15-2010 07:18 PM

Mike, the only real reason I am building this is I WANT ONE and you’re right that is a good enough reason.

As for the screws AND glue, put it down to my MOD (DOD) training. Redundancy got men to the moon and back, including the ill fated Apollo 13. Good enough for me.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View wchips's profile

wchips

314 posts in 1839 days


#3 posted 05-15-2010 08:35 PM

Are you going to have a power feed to push the boards through the sander? I have a old wide belt sander that the power feed motor went bad on . Checked several places and they all told me the same thing, that motor is unavelable. they quit making them quite some time ago. tried pushing the stock through by hand that is easier said than done.

-- wchips

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#4 posted 05-15-2010 09:06 PM

Wchips, no, no power feed. Keeping it low tech. It will only be a light use machine. If it does break though a simple machine is easier and cheaper to repair than a complex one.

Regarding your machine, pushing, manually, on a dead belt must be difficult. If theres a solid bed underneath it might be better to take the belt off if you’re going for manual push.

I’ll have to experiment with manual feed techniques on mine, which has a solid table. I can see that the Formica topped table, called for in the original design, presents the lowest friction but I’m yet to be convinced that an ordinary surface, like oiled MDF, will not be ‘slippy’ enough. Have to try it for myself. I’ll let you know later in the blog.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View degoose's profile

degoose

7052 posts in 2106 days


#5 posted 05-15-2010 10:24 PM

Coming along nicely.. I too over-engineer things but then they do seem to last longer…unlike some manufacturers who will try and save 1c on each item …

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#6 posted 05-15-2010 10:32 PM

I agree Larry. Its one thing I admire about the way our Americans cousins engineer things. Belt and braces every time.

Penny wise, Pound foolish is the phrase (English) I believe that describes the ‘bean counters’ who cut out all but the bare minimum.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#7 posted 05-16-2010 10:14 AM

Autumn. I certainly hope its easier from here but I’ve got a bad feeling about mounting the motor. Oh and definitions.

Fettle (verb) – to make adjustments to something in order to optimise its performance or condition.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#8 posted 05-16-2010 01:52 PM

Autumn, thank you very much for this. It is most helpful and solves the problem of positioning the motor in three dimensional space, whilst I figure out how to mount it, brilliantly. I can use bricks and a car sissor-jack to do something similar.

However (yes you knew that was coming didn’t you) the motor I have has no feet along its side and the only mounting points it has are on the face where the spindle comes out. There’s a plate attached to that with a pivot point on it (cant remove it as the pulleys set it jammed on the spindle).

Theres also a piece of the casting it was pivoted off that I’ve cut off with my trusty angle grinder.
I just need to figure out how to use this instead of the regular foot option. Its either that or design some strap-on feet to get me back to the normal mounting method. I have a few ideas. This is actually the sort of challenge that I enjoy prevailing over I’m just a bit fed up at the moment. It’ll pass.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1281 posts in 2493 days


#9 posted 05-16-2010 05:49 PM

I have a Delta store bought one. I think yours is the first multi-speed shop made one I have seen. I am such a nut for machines; I will still probably build one of these someday. Around here we say “fiddle with” to mean tweak, “tune up” or make minor adjustments. I would just hang it off the one bolt hole; it looks pretty substantial and obviously worked well enough in its prior life…

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1787 days


#10 posted 05-16-2010 08:11 PM

jm, you may be right, about the multi-speed and hanging the motor.

Martyn

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112933 posts in 2328 days


#11 posted 05-17-2010 05:12 AM

Good work Martyn

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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