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Roubo Workbench #6: The Leg Vise

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Blog entry by Brandon posted 822 days ago 8198 reads 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: The Legs and Stretchers Part 6 of Roubo Workbench series Part 7: The Sliding Dead-man »

Before getting to the leg vise, just a quick note on the tenons on the top. I purposely made the tenons about 1/4” longer than they needed to be so that they would sit proud of the bench top. I did this because it would minimize damage on the ends of the tenons while trying to fit the top to the base. Also, this makes it easy to flush up perfectly once everything is in place. So, once the top was set in place and draw-bored tight, I cut the protruding tenons flush with the rest of the bench top. Then I planed it flush when I flattened the top.

Now it’s time to begin work on the vises. For the leg vise I decided to use some mystery wood that felt super dense. Rather than running through the planer, I used a #5 and #4 to scrub it down, then flattened with a #8 followed by a #4 for smoothing. My plane collection was pretty limited at the time, but now I would have chosen different planes for bringing the rough lumber down to a nice and smooth board.

The shape I chose is basically the one that Chris Schwarz’ uses in his workbench book. I found it pleasing enough. I just marked the shaped I wanted with thick lines.

Then I cut the shape on the bandsaw and cleaned up the edges with a handplane. Then I took the router with a chamfer bit and put a healthy chamfer on the outer edges of the chop.

The next step was to drill a hole in the vise for the screw. The tail vise screw from Lee Valley seemed like the perfect fit for a leg vise. And it was! Though hats off to those who use large wooden vise screws, which are pretty awesome.

Now on to the parallel guide, which keeps the leg vise sitting perfectly vertical, otherwise it would just swing around. The parallel guide also is a board with more holes in it than cottage cheese and it is designed to counter vertical racking when tightening the vise. I attached the parallel guide by mortising a small hole in the leg vise and securing it with screws, covered by dowels.

And here’s the completed leg vise.

One might notice that the leg vise is a little thin. The board I used was about 5/4” planed down to about 4/4. It worked OK, but it bowed a little when I tightened the vise, and so I replaced it with a thicker board, which I’ll point out later. Next up is the tail vise.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"



11 comments so far

View TDog's profile

TDog

233 posts in 826 days


#1 posted 822 days ago

thats a great looking bench and the leg vice is a nice addition.
I am building a roubo for my next bench to replace my current oak plywood concoction which
has served me well of course. Nice work!

-- "So many projects...so little time..." Psalm 23

View Don W's profile

Don W

14604 posts in 1164 days


#2 posted 822 days ago

your doing well.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4136 posts in 1548 days


#3 posted 822 days ago

Thanks guys. I just have a bunch of these photos from the build, so I figure I better start posting them or they’ll have been for naught. The bench is working out great so far! I don’t know how I got by without it.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4779 posts in 1219 days


#4 posted 822 days ago

I wish i could go with a through tenon on my bench. I like the looks of exposed joinery. Yet, it interferes with the dog hole strip.

Thanks for taking the time to share this.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6747 posts in 1748 days


#5 posted 822 days ago

I like the arts and craft style tenons on the streatchers. Too bad that piece of wood didnt work for the leg vise, that is a sweet piece of wood.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View jjw5858's profile

jjw5858

1109 posts in 1198 days


#6 posted 803 days ago

This is really looking good. Awesome job on the bench and this blog series, thanks for posting it!

-- "Make something you love tomorrow...and do it slowly" JLB

View Angela's profile

Angela

205 posts in 1492 days


#7 posted 753 days ago

I see you last posted your project 69 days ago, do you have an update. I recently did a blog on a project and understand it a lot of work and very time consuming but I love you bench so far and would love to see the rest of the construction. Also if it’s finished how do you like it after using it? Would you change anything? I really appreciate the first page of the blog about the types of woods you thought about using.

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4136 posts in 1548 days


#8 posted 753 days ago

Thanks Angela! I still plan on adding a couple of more posts—-hopefully this week I will get around to doing it. :-)

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6747 posts in 1748 days


#9 posted 735 days ago

The piece of Jatoba you used for your deadman seems a lot darker than the piece I have, mine looks more like your leg vise.

You need to finish this blog series man!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4136 posts in 1548 days


#10 posted 735 days ago

Mauricio,

I’ve had some variation in the color of the jatoba—- see, for instance the lamp I made ( http://lumberjocks.com/projects/54725 ). That said, have you put any oil or finish on it? It will likely darken some more.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6747 posts in 1748 days


#11 posted 735 days ago

I need to put some mineral spirits on it to see how it will look. Honestly it looks so nice that amlost doesnt need a finish.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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