LumberJocks

Hand Tool Journey

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Blog series by Blake updated 1583 days ago 12 parts 54821 reads 164 comments total

Part 1: Lately I've really been getting into hand tools.

1873 days ago by Blake | 7 comments »

Lately I’ve really been getting into hand tools. I asked for a few Japanese chisels for Christmas (one each from a few different people in the family.) I ended up with a set of four from Woodcraft. I decided that this collection was worthy of family heirloom status so I had them laser engraved and built a box to keep them in. I have always had a fascination with Japanese culture, art and woodworking. Lately I have been reading Japanese Woodworking Tools, Their Tradition, Spir...

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Part 2: My first Krenov Style Plane

1865 days ago by Blake | 9 comments »

I made my first plane! I used the blade from one of those old wooden planes I had. As you can see I had a variety of these old planes with different style blades. Straight, concave, and a couple different radii of convex blades: Here are some progress photos… Making the Body: I started out with a block of Koa that I got on our honeymoon in Kauai, Hawaii. Look, two plane bodies! I used the width of the blade as a guide to cut my block into slabs. I...

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Part 3: Amazing find... Maebiki-nokogiri

1796 days ago by Blake | 16 comments »

So as I have mentioned in previous blogs, I have been studying and collecting Japanese hand tools. And my favorite book which has inspired the collection is JAPANESE WOODWORKING TOOLS by Toshio Odate. In this book there is a section on saws (Nokogiri) where Odate proudly displays a favorite in his collection: This saw was a rip saw used to mill large stock. The wide blade was designed to keep the cut straight in very thick lumber. It was used by the mighty kobiki-shokunin (s...

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Part 4: Building a Work Bench

1648 days ago by Blake | 18 comments »

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak. I don’t really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4”. I forgot to take a “before” photo of the stack but here is a sample: Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than ...

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Part 5: More Bench Progress

1640 days ago by Blake | 14 comments »

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer… And chopped the ends square I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated “slabs,” since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer: Two slabs glued up: And now glued up with the tool tray: THE BASE I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot: A little shaping of the feet on the b...

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Part 6: Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

1613 days ago by Blake | 15 comments »

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing “low angle jack planes” for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine. Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane: And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERI...

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Part 7: Bench Almost Complete

1612 days ago by Blake | 15 comments »

More bench progress… Here is the “tail” vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used: Clamping on the wider “apron” pieces front and back: And adding the end aprons with dowels: As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black: I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor: And then the...

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Part 8: Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

1609 days ago by Blake | 21 comments »

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim. Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG. This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted: Here it is in pieces: And here are a couple “before” photos of the body: Here̵...

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Part 9: Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

1597 days ago by Blake | 14 comments »

Stanley No. 62 After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a “before photo” as a reminder: In my last post WayneC commented:I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax...

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Part 10: First Hand-Cut Dovetails

1588 days ago by Blake | 14 comments »

I finally got a chance to practice hand-cutting dovetails. This is the first time I’ve made a cut with my new Japanese dovetail saw and use my new bench too. I started out with a couple scrap pieces of pine: I drew the tails: First cut… didn’t follow the line so well. It will take some getting used to. Here are all the cuts. Some are pretty good and some are pretty far off the line. This photo is AWESOME. Because as you can see, I did a beautif...

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Part 11: Turn of the Century Disston Dovetail Saw

1981 days ago by Blake | 11 comments »

I found this beautiful old saw hanging on my wall yesterday. I think I bought it at at the flea market a while back and forgot about it. Its really nice, but its been abused and neglected. Its time for a face lift. I am assuming it is a dovetail saw? I want to know more about it. I would like to become more of a hand tool user. On the blade it says ”HENRY DISSTON AND SONS, CAST STEEL, PHILADA.USA, WARRENTED” And the handle says ”C. ROSENBURG” on both sides. It al...

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Part 12: 100+ year old Disston Backsaw ...RESTORED

1583 days ago by Blake | 10 comments »

After some help from fellow Lumberjocks and a little research (here), I determined that this beautiful old backsaw is about a hundred years old (give or take). ”Before” photos: After: I carefully took apart old saw and put the blade through the electrolysis process. Then I stripped the handle (which was covered in layers of paint and dripped varnish)... and applied Shellac. I also polished the brass. This is the result: On a side note… Her...

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