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Dewalt 735 Chip Collection/Stand #4: Installing the door and filters

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Blog entry by Blackbear posted 04-14-2013 12:06 AM 1383 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Building the Cabinet Part 4 of Dewalt 735 Chip Collection/Stand series Part 5: Results and Lessons Learned »

With the cabinet complete except for the door, it was time to start installing the fittings.

I upgraded the hose from the 2.5” hose that the dust right uses to a 4” hose, hoping this would help clear more of the chips that were blowing back into the machine. I picked up the hose, and a 4” plastic universal flange from Rockler. The hose was actually 10’ long, and I cut a piece off for the planer cart.

Using a 4” hole saw in my cordless drill, I drilled a hole in the right side of the cabinet (right side when looking from the front of the planer). I knew I did not want the hole right near the top because the filter would be near the top, so I spaced it down a bit while making sure to be above the plastic bin.

I put some caulking on the plastic flange, and screwed it over the 4” hole. The caulking I figured would ensure a tight air seal. I then installed the 4” hose with a hose clamp. With that, the cabinet inlet was done.

On the inside of the cabinet, I cut a piece of aluminum and bent it over the corner of a table, then cut a strip of scrap hardwood and screwed the metal over the inside of the inlet. I figured this would help to direct the chips downward into the plastic bin. In reality, after testing this does work but the fan on the planer is so strong the chips still fly all over the cabinet.

Next I used the same hole saw and cut an outlet hole for the air. On the inside of the cabinet I screwed the filter mounting flange shown in the first blog post, then slipped the filter on. Not a bad fit.

Last thing to do was to mount and seal the door. I picked up some peel and stick weather stripping from a big box store. Sorry about the bad picture.

I then installed two hinges and a handle. Lastly I installed four metal rings to hook bungie cords onto. I was thinking the bungee cords would help keep the door sealed against the weather stripping. Originally I wanted to find some kind of latch, like what you find on most metal tool boxes, that would pull the door tightly shut and latch it. Those are apparently difficult to find, which is why I settled on the bungie cord method.

Next and last post, some initial testing and a couple of changes from testing.



3 comments so far

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13752 posts in 1360 days


#1 posted 04-14-2013 12:40 AM

Great looking “Chip & Dust Cabinet”!!! Nice job.

Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3….
Is this thing on???

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View Blackbear's profile

Blackbear

103 posts in 905 days


#2 posted 04-14-2013 12:58 AM

Thanks DIYaholic! I may end up putting some Watco Golden Oak Danish Oil on it in the future just to make it look sharp.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13752 posts in 1360 days


#3 posted 04-14-2013 01:31 AM

Don’t make it look too “sharp”....
It may cut you!!! ;^)

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

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