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New Shop Build #2: So it begins

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Blog entry by Bikerdan posted 04-12-2018 08:48 PM 405 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: In the beginning, there was nothing... Part 2 of New Shop Build series no next part

Hey everybody! It’s been a bit since my last post. Things have been going a little slow due to weather and vacations. The last post was just to introduce the project. At that time, nothing had been done except for getting the building permit.

Since then, I’ve broken ground!!! The first step is to get the foundation and floor poured. This is one of the only couple of stages that I’m going to stand back and let an expert take care of for me. I need to make sure this part is done right!

For anyone else that might be considering doing this sort of build, here are a couple of special considerations that I’ve made for this part of the build. First, if you’re doing a curb around the outside like I am you will need to make sure that you have the correct widths for the openings. In my case, I’m going 38.5 inches for the 3-0 man door and 10’2” for the garage door. This allows room for casing and weather stripping to be installed for the garage without having too much overlap of the garage door. I also am making sure that they use blocks to leave a cut out in the stem wall where the garage door track will come down to the floor. I’m making sure that we have conduit for both the elecric coming in and also for anything I want to run to the otherside of the garage. Finally, I’m having a garage door entry gutter installed to help with water since I’m trying to keep the garage floor as level as possible since it’s going to be used as a shop. There will be a slight slope for the first couple of feet of the floor.

In the pics, you can see how the location was prepped as well as the first stages of forming. There is still a bit to be done before the pour. Conduit needs to be laid, the outer portions of the form need to be installed with some backfill done.

I hope this is helpful and if any of you have any thoughs and/or suggestions, please speak up! I love to hear your ideas.



6 comments so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3027 posts in 2225 days


#1 posted 04-12-2018 09:04 PM

Dan, it looks like a good start to me. Keep up the good work and keep the pix coming.

-- Art

View Bikerdan's profile

Bikerdan

46 posts in 264 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 01:47 AM

Thank you Art!

View Bikerdan's profile

Bikerdan

46 posts in 264 days


#3 posted 04-13-2018 03:47 PM

Update: Just had footing inspection and passed! We should be pouring tomorrow if weather permits!

View Andre's profile

Andre

1786 posts in 1774 days


#4 posted 04-14-2018 02:31 AM

Not sure how things are done there, but usually we pour a grade beam under the door ways, especially the overhead door? My shop was built on a floating pad as the soil in these parts is very stable on a sand base.
In hindsight I should of put in a smaller door, maybe only a 8 or 10 ft. instead of the 16ft.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Bikerdan

46 posts in 264 days


#5 posted 04-14-2018 02:53 AM

Good question Andre. That’s one reason I’m leaving this part to the experts. :) But from what I understand, for this shop and it’s size, a spread footing is more than enough support. All load bearing walls will be around the perimeter where the monolithic foundation is thickest. Maybe a grade beam is not required because my garage door is only 10’ wide. Not sure. Honestly, concrete work is a bit out of my realm of expertise. :/

View Andre's profile

Andre

1786 posts in 1774 days


#6 posted 04-15-2018 05:11 PM

Grade beams are important to prevent concrete settle or heaving under door, around here due to freezing. Also make sure they pin all the different sections together properly. Looks like 24’ spacing on the re-bar. (I like 18” if using 3/8”) For my overhead door went 6” spacing for re-bar and pins, my pad was 5” thick poured over
2” Styrofoam with 1/2” pex tubing embedded for in floor heating.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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