LumberJocks

I am starting over from Scratch!

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by BigDClampit posted 04-02-2017 12:12 AM 1080 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

New Member Introduction

Hello fellow lovers of lumber and woodworking. I had a shop in my large basement 20 years ago. Due to a move to a smaller space and a job change I gave it up and sold all my woodworking tools (table saw, bandsaw, router table, jointer-planer, sander to mention some of the larger ones) I also had a 19 foot long hardwood workbench.

But alas the years ticked on and now I have large footprint for a workshop.
I dont need anything fancy but would like…

—Two 12 foot wall benches with storage for tools on movable French cleat system.

—Moveable bench with chop saw mounted.

—Hand tool working bench with proper clamps and dog system (I will build from maple milled from my yard)

The space is 24X26 that I have. The nook is 12X4 feet with an overhead light.

The walls were cut for a sump pump wall drainage system so I will repair that first, wire then plywood walls.

If you seasoned workshop guys have any cool ideas I am all ears.

-- We should take the time to woodwork. After all it is our time.



9 comments so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2832 posts in 3641 days


#1 posted 04-02-2017 05:07 AM

Same situation for me… A shop in my younger years then marriage and kids took over and I did a 25 yr break. About 10 years ago I started again. My shop is similar. 24×24 ft. I made it 10 yrs ago and have done major reworking of it twice since then. I had a mishmash of older tools and newer ones.

Your space, although nice and adequate, I’ve found gets smaller over time. Plugs, plugs, plugs. You won’t know how you’ll rearrange things over time. Don’t put the bulk of the plugs on one side or one wall as you may end up moving some tools over time.

Wheels. I started out with some things on wheels, now everything is. You need room to put a board into a planer. Be able to pull it out and with a long enough dust collection hose. Choose some quality wheels that are at least 3” diameter. Anything less don’t roll so good on wood chips and sawdust.

I’m not a heavy hand tool user. So, I changed from a woodworkers workbench to a nice square assembly table that doubles as an outfeed table for my table saw. Just the right height.

Unless you spend many hundreds (thousands?) of dollars on dust collection and filtering, plan on dust getting on everything. If you have lots of other stuff and hand power tools, opt for drawers and cabinets to keep them in instead of proudly displaying them. They will just always look dusty all the time.

Well, it’s late, time for bed. I could go on… Have fun!

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2687 posts in 3126 days


#2 posted 04-02-2017 12:30 PM

I have built/modified three workshops over the last ten years. My suggestion is, when locating elec. outlets place them high on the wall Like, fifty inches from the floor. This way you can reach them easily and still lean a full sheet of plywood against the wall. Put the elec. wiring in conduit on the surface of the wall so that you can move or change later, if needs be. Also, every place you decide to put a duplex outlet opt for fourplexes instead. I put my dust collector outside the shop in a metal shed dedicated to it. I have my air compressor outside my shop in a seperate building. Keeps the noise down.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Website> craftingcouple.com

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2335 posts in 2519 days


#3 posted 04-02-2017 10:09 PM

You can use plywood for your wall covering, but if you shop around you will find that OSB is about half the price. But what ever you use PAINT it white … you’ll be amazed at how bright it makes the shop.
Two 12 foot benches is a good idea BUT, a flat space will collect junk … Think about multiple roll around stands for the planer, sander etc. ... Of course, it is your shop, so do it your way … look at magazines and steal ideas from them.

The best design for any shop is place your power tools so that you break down and store the wood near the biggest door, and as you move through out the shop you fine tune each piece. In my shop the Miter saw, table saw, and wood storage shelves are the first thing, then the band saws drill press and sanders Then turn left, to an assembly table and a workbench.

As you assemble your shop think about dust collection as it is a main part these days, Don’t do like so many of us and make it the last thing you install … And if you place it outside, you are sucking several hundred Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) of air out of your shop … how are you replacing it? Are you sucking in the cold winters air to your warm shop? Or in my case 115°-120° air into my air conditioned space … I have no friends at the power company so I use the least amount to $ave.

I hope that there is some tips that you can use here … any further questions? don’t hesitate to ask

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

526 posts in 1838 days


#4 posted 04-03-2017 04:00 AM

I’m in about the same place you are right now. We just moved and I am faced with building a new shop and keep looking for a starting point. My shop will be slightly smaller than yours, but still bigger than my old shop.

Keeping outlets at about 50” high is what i did in the old shop. It works great and i will definately do it again. I’m installing 48” linkable LED lighting. I can daisy chain up to 10 lights on a single circuit. I’ll let you know how they work out.

What, if anything, are you planning for your floor? Im debating using Rust-Oleum epoxy coating, but still looking for other options. I’m looking forward to seeing your progress.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2832 posts in 3641 days


#5 posted 04-03-2017 09:25 AM

Another couple of things.

You can purchase those 4 bulb 48” florescent light fixtures that they use in hung ceilings at Home depot for about $50. They throw a lot of light, have a diffuser that’s hinged and flips down, and they don’t buzz or flicker. Often you can find them on sale for about $10 bucks on craigslist. And if you want to make them look good, mount them on the ceiling and box them in with 4” strips of sanded plywood. I’ve got 5 of them in the shop.

After using oil porch and deck on the floor and seeing it scrape a lot. When I installed a new high density particle board floor I used some water based light grey porch and deck (behr’s) It’s been extremely durable. Doesn’t scratch when moving around stuff.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View BigDClampit's profile

BigDClampit

16 posts in 717 days


#6 posted 05-01-2017 12:27 AM

Hello Guys and thank you so much for the valuable input. I got some very good ideas and insight from the detailed comments. Sorry it took me so long to respond but I didn’t get a notification that there were comments and I have been busy and forgot to check. It is spring here and the wife has had me outside doing yard projects for the past 2 weeks.

The ideas about the stationary benches collecting stuff is so true. In my past WS I had a 19’ long bench with multi-species hardwood flooring for the top (beautiful) and it was covered with stuff until I sold the house. I get it. I think cabinets to store the stuff in would be better and have an assembly bench and hand tool bench. Tools on wheels is a good idea too.. outfeed table height another good idea. ... dust collection…. outlets 50” or so and using conduit….and 4 plexes….

The floor I think I will just scrub well and put a good latex/Alkyd deck paint. touch it up every couple of years.

Thanks again and I will try to be better about checking in. My interest level is high… my time is low… I am a full time real estate agent and need to keep the house maintained too.

-- We should take the time to woodwork. After all it is our time.

View BigDClampit's profile

BigDClampit

16 posts in 717 days


#7 posted 05-01-2017 01:00 AM

Hello Guys,
Another thing that took time was that we had a maple tree in the front yard that had to come down. I had the tree guys save me two 20” logs 8 feet long. I took them to the local lumber mill and had them milled into 8/4 and some 4/4 for a future woodworking bench for my shop. I guess they need to dry for the summer before I touch them.

-- We should take the time to woodwork. After all it is our time.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

2335 posts in 2519 days


#8 posted 05-01-2017 01:12 AM

Now that you have that nice maple all stacked and stickered, get some cover and weight on it to help minimize the warping and twisting as it dries … and the rule of thumb is dry for 1 year for every 1 inch of thickness … A good moisture meter is a great investment.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View BigDClampit's profile

BigDClampit

16 posts in 717 days


#9 posted 05-01-2017 01:22 AM



Now that you have that nice maple all stacked and stickered, get some cover and weight on it to help minimize the warping and twisting as it dries … and the rule of thumb is dry for 1 year for every 1 inch of thickness … A good moisture meter is a great investment.

- Grumpymike

Thank you Grumpymike,

Yes I went to Home Depot today and got 2 3X8 foot tin roof panels. I will make a 6X8 roof for it. I have a couple of 4X4s on it (stickered under them) and I will ad a couple more. I need some more weight though. Maybe some old plywood and cement pads.

That would be 2 years to dry. I will get a meter. My miller will pop it in a load to kiln dry if he has space (after it is air dried for 6 months of summer)

-- We should take the time to woodwork. After all it is our time.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com