LumberJocks

The art of building Wooden boats

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Blog entry by BigBrownLog posted 03-16-2016 03:14 AM 1089 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m just getting this blog post started so it already set up, but in the next 6 months I should have everything up and running for me to build wooden boats for people. I’ll be starting out with some strip built kayaks and canoes most likely. In all actuality I have no idea what people are going to want. I plan on just getting the word out and let people come to me so we can sit down and draw up exactly what they want. After I’ve got a good thing going I will start cold molding and using strataglass to build small to medium sized yachts. Basically I’m gonna shoot for the moon and turn this into a decent income for me in the long run. Personally I’m gonna build myself a chris craft and a manowar style sailing ship but I will fit it with machine guns rather than cannons to protect from pirating.

Yeah it’s gonna be a while before I get up and running but I promise it will be informative and beautiful on here. Maybe it will inspire some of you to help keep the art alive.

here are a few pics of the last boat

Boatman out.

-- Whoever said nothing is impossible has obviously never tried to staple water to a tree



8 comments so far

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2547 days


#1 posted 03-16-2016 01:10 PM

Best of luck to you. I would love to be able to do the same thing. Damn day job seems to always get in the way. Maybe if I was not so addicted to the pay check. Any way, the best to you!

-- Chris K

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3024 days


#2 posted 03-16-2016 01:34 PM

Hey Boatman,

Nice Passagemaker! I’m about to start building a take-apart version. I build an Eastport Pram a couple of years ago. I’ve been looking at a larger version too (i.e. Pelican, Welsford, Pocketship, etc.). Where are you located? My dream is to do a circumnavigation on a sailboat (not necessarily one that I built), but at least the tender might be homemade. Part of my process is developing a way to cut out kit parts on a CNC machine that is smaller in one dimension than the part (e.g. cut out 7’8” panels from 8’ plywood. BTW, PMDBuilders.net has been shut down, so I posted my stuff on my site, Midnight-Maker.com.

Good luck with your dream! I’m looking forward to following your blog.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3024 days


#3 posted 03-16-2016 01:41 PM

Hey Chris K,

I’m in the process of building this same boat from plans, meaning I’m drawing out and cutting all of the parts out. It’s also available in a CNC kit where the parts just show up on your doorstep in a box. I’m going with plans partly for the joy of doing the whole thing by myself, but also because I can buy the wood a little at a time instead of the cost of the kit in one shot. A couple of years ago, I built a smaller version of this boat and it took about 120 man hours to build, including sewing my own sail. I’m thinking this one will come in under 200 hours easily, especially now that I’ve got experience. My point is that this is a great boat design and is very doable. Only 4 hours per week and you can have one by next Spring!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View BigBrownLog's profile

BigBrownLog

61 posts in 1732 days


#4 posted 03-16-2016 04:00 PM

hey skully I assume you got your plans,parts and other materials from Chesapeake light craft, bear mountain boats, or ? cant remember the name of the other one right not. I was thinking that I will design my own plans to make unique boats that don’t exist for people. I think I will also build my own CnC machine for cut outs and for strip built boats I want to build my own saw that will multirip and bead and cove in one pass. I think chesapeake light craft has this set up.


Hey Chris K,

I m in the process of building this same boat from plans, meaning I m drawing out and cutting all of the parts out. It s also available in a CNC kit where the parts just show up on your doorstep in a box. I m going with plans partly for the joy of doing the whole thing by myself, but also because I can buy the wood a little at a time instead of the cost of the kit in one shot. A couple of years ago, I built a smaller version of this boat and it took about 120 man hours to build, including sewing my own sail. I m thinking this one will come in under 200 hours easily, especially now that I ve got experience. My point is that this is a great boat design and is very doable. Only 4 hours per week and you can have one by next Spring!

- CaptainSkully

-- Whoever said nothing is impossible has obviously never tried to staple water to a tree

View BigBrownLog's profile

BigBrownLog

61 posts in 1732 days


#5 posted 03-16-2016 04:08 PM

I am located in Lafayette Louisiana. Mid south Louisiana 10 mins south of I-10. I welcome any of you guys to come visit and play in my shop with me. If you REALLY want to circumnavigate the world then you are invited to be my deckhand when and if I ever build my manowar. The ocean is where I belong and I’ve spent the great majority of my life in the ocean, I think I was a pirate in another life. We will stay clear of Icy waters though, most likely circle the earth just north or south of the equator.


Hey Boatman,

Nice Passagemaker! I m about to start building a take-apart version. I build an Eastport Pram a couple of years ago. I ve been looking at a larger version too (i.e. Pelican, Welsford, Pocketship, etc.). Where are you located? My dream is to do a circumnavigation on a sailboat (not necessarily one that I built), but at least the tender might be homemade. Part of my process is developing a way to cut out kit parts on a CNC machine that is smaller in one dimension than the part (e.g. cut out 7 8” panels from 8 plywood. BTW, PMDBuilders.net has been shut down, so I posted my stuff on my site, Midnight-Maker.com.

Good luck with your dream! I m looking forward to following your blog.

- CaptainSkully

-- Whoever said nothing is impossible has obviously never tried to staple water to a tree

View BigBrownLog's profile

BigBrownLog

61 posts in 1732 days


#6 posted 03-16-2016 04:22 PM

Hey Chris I hear ya about the work schedule thing. I’m in somewhat of a unique position because 4 years ago I was injured and almost died so I am disabled and have SSDI but it don’t cover all the bills and If I did get a job to cover the extra needed then I’d lose that income so I said to myself create your own income off the books. I really wish I could say that work is getting in the way of things but I’m bassically f*cked. If the oil industry comes back then I will get back into my career and just say screw social security cause that means I will have a huge salary and I get it while playing under the surface of the ocean which I call my sanctuary.

If you get a kit from chesapeake light craft the parts are already cut out and delivered to you so you just have to do the manufacturing assembly and you will be getting your experience. You could literally work on it 1 hour a night little by little if you wanted to because you have no time crunch deadline. Give it a try, it’s so rewarding seeing this marvel you created after you are finished. Just to let you know, you will probably think a 1/4” thick hull will break or wont last. Incorrect, after you’re done it’s about as solid as steel or concrete but light enough to carry on your back.


Best of luck to you. I would love to be able to do the same thing. Damn day job seems to always get in the way. Maybe if I was not so addicted to the pay check. Any way, the best to you!

- ChrisK

-- Whoever said nothing is impossible has obviously never tried to staple water to a tree

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3024 days


#7 posted 03-17-2016 02:28 AM

I actually built most of my Eastport Pram on lunch hours because I was building it in my shop at work. Cut out a part, epoxy another part, do some stitches, etc. So 1 hour per day means a boat in about 3-4 months!

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View BigBrownLog's profile

BigBrownLog

61 posts in 1732 days


#8 posted 03-17-2016 02:55 AM

Yup it’s a pretty easy process once you get started. The most time consuming thing is when you have your 5 quarter 5/4 6”*8” that you have to multirip for strip built then bead and cove each one of those strips. The rest is quick and easy or spread it out if you want something to keep you busy. I really can’t wait to take this to a pro level and compete with F&S boatworks. I went to their shop and asked if I could come help so I could learn cold molding but they said they didn’t need help. I had a tour of this amazing 60’ yacht they made with plywood. I ain’t kiddin ya, this thing was incredible inside and out. Maybe one day they will call me to come help but they better watch out because I will learn some secrets and be their competition. They are actually considered the best custom boat manufacturer by yachting magazine.


I actually built most of my Eastport Pram on lunch hours because I was building it in my shop at work. Cut out a part, epoxy another part, do some stitches, etc. So 1 hour per day means a boat in about 3-4 months!

- CaptainSkully

-- Whoever said nothing is impossible has obviously never tried to staple water to a tree

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