LumberJocks

A Cabinetmakers Workbench

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by BigBob posted 2120 days ago 20716 reads 23 times favorited 47 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A few years ago, I started to think about building myself a real workbench. I had read Krenovs books and wanted to get away from corded apprentices and start to really see what I could do with out a machine screaming.
The decision was made to built a Cabinetmakers Workbench. I wanted a bench to do handwork only on, no machines would ever come near this bench. I have my old bench to run routers on etc. I had a few hundred board feet of white oak in the shop that I bought a few years ago. I just could not really afford to go out and buy 12/4 maple so I laminated the stock that I had on hand. It would end up with it’s quartersawn edge showing and it wears like iron.
I started the bench with the tresle base. I laminated 3×3 and 2×3 raills and then joined them by hand with wedged thru mortise and tenon joinery with ebony wedges.

(The base joinery)!:http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g148/robmill54/P1010049.jpg



47 comments so far

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#1 posted 2120 days ago

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#2 posted 2120 days ago

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#3 posted 2120 days ago

The legs are joined to the base with draw bored dowels that I made out of ebony.

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2622 days


#4 posted 2120 days ago

Beautigorgeomus! When ya going to put a top on that baby and commence producing shavings instead of sawdust? Can’t wait to see the rest.

-- Jim

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#5 posted 2120 days ago

Once the base was completed it was time to laminated the top. I laminated them in three sections and routed full length 1/2” splines to join them together. I made the dog hole section and was ready to assemble.

Once that was completed, it looked like this:

View Blake's profile

Blake

3437 posts in 2506 days


#6 posted 2120 days ago

Wow, what a neat project. It will make a great stand for all of your power tools to sit on (kidding) But seriously, its cool how you are doing it totally “unplugged.” I can’t wait to see it finished.

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#7 posted 2120 days ago

I used a floating breadboard on each end of the top and milled a bling half inch spline in each end. The breadboard ends are held in place with a large dovetail, no glue and one 6” bolt to allow the top to move with seasonal changes.
Here I am cutting the dovetail in the ends and the dog hole section.

The completed dovetail.

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#8 posted 2120 days ago

Another view of the top with the ends in place. Here I am hand cutting the dovetails for tool tray.

View Grant Davis's profile

Grant Davis

615 posts in 2540 days


#9 posted 2120 days ago

WOW, love the detail. I have not built one of these but I do need to get one built. Thanks for posting.

-- Grant...."GO BUCKEYES"

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#10 posted 2120 days ago

The quartersawn figure just blew my mind, I was really surprised by how much figure it had and was very careful with grain direction etc.

Here is the top without the tail vise. I was really nrvious about the end vise because I had never built one, and I did all the joinery in this bench completedly without power tools.

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#11 posted 2120 days ago

At this point, I thought I had better start to pre-level the top and I was dreading the end vise. I broke out the jack plane, the the jointer and then my Stanley # 80 and used winding sticks to remove any wind the top. The bottom has the same level of finish as the top.

The completed top being turned over and finishing with hand planes.

Next the end vise construction.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5352 posts in 2217 days


#12 posted 2120 days ago

One might almost eat at this bench looks nice and petite well done Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#13 posted 2120 days ago

With the top completed, it was time to turn to the dreaded end vise. I read and re-read everything I could find on the details. In the end, I just went for it. I wanted the end vise to be a diiferent species of wood and contrast from the bench. I buy most of my hardwood from Merrill over at Alva Hardwwods in Alva Fl, and told I need a special board for thi vise.
He digs around the warehouse and pops up with a beautiful piece of Honduras Rosewood that he stashed for years. He said he knew someone would want it one day . At about 40 bucks a board ft I gulped hard and asked how much.
” thanks for all your business” and he gives it me. You gotta respect a guy like that.
Anyway here is how I made the end vise. I starte with a n oak “core” that the vise made around. This core has to be made very carefully as it contains the main screw and determines the throw of the vise. The first step is to install the face plate to the bench, followed by the core.

Next is to build a case around the core. I could have just screwed this together as it will never be seen inside the vise but, I dovetailed it. Now, I know it’s there and that it is strong so…....


The inside of the core case has the dog holes cut into then. I angled them the opposite way from the others in the bench top by a few degrees to provide a gripping action. Here the case is installed with the outer cover of rosewood .

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#14 posted 2120 days ago

Thanks for all the compliments. I hope you like this project.

View BigBob's profile

BigBob

64 posts in 2121 days


#15 posted 2120 days ago

I cut the best figure of the rosewood for the top of the vise. First I made a cardboard template to be absolutely certain that I had the layout for the dog holes exact. I laid out the dogs holes and drilled a series of 1/8” holes. Using a razor sharp chisel, I carefully squared the dog holes.

The top installed and being leveled with the top with my # 80 scraper.

The bench top is completed and now I used my jck plane, my jointer plane and finally my # 80 to level the top.

showing 1 through 15 of 47 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase