LumberJocks

Hand Tools doings #21: Plane refurbishing job

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Blog entry by Betsy posted 2307 days ago 4279 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 20: Sharpening - from frustration to pretty close to elation Part 21 of Hand Tools doings series Part 22: Trimming up with a plane »

I’ve had this e-bay plane for quite some time now. I’ve had it apart and left it on my fireplace hearth for months just looking at it, not really knowing what to do with it. Got a wild hair this morning and picked it up and started to work on it. It’s no where near perfection as, honestly, I really don’t know what I’m doing, but it works. This is the plane as I got it.

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I had already taken off the tote and front knob and put a new finish on those. But as for working, this would not have cut butter—- but now….

Before

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After. Granted this is cypress which is not such a hard wood——but still…

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I’m feeling so much better about my tools now that I’m starting to figure out how to sharpen them. I’ll have my sharpening class at Kelly Mehler’s school in a few weeks and that should really help me a lot.

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The tote and front knob are not really tight—- but I figure that the class I’m taking will fix that for me.

Thanks for all your encouragement and tips along the way.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!



10 comments so far

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

780 posts in 2819 days


#1 posted 2307 days ago

Nice job. From the pics, it appears that you have a type 17 Stanley (WWII era). If you haven’t yet been to Patrick’s Blood and Gore page, there’s a wealth of info there on Stanley planes & their history. I’d add a link if I knew how, but you can just google it by that name.
I started by cleaning up one, and now I own about a dozen. (I am not a collector…I am not a collector, he said over & over again as they put him in the rubber room) -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2393 days


#2 posted 2307 days ago

thats a nice find. those old planes are very nice and unlike a lot of the big box store hand tools they were made to last. I think that this one is in the right hands and once you tune it up some more and get some more work with it it will perform as good or better that any other planes that you can get out there. One of my friends has an old Stanley (not sure if its a bedrock I thought it was) Jointer Plane. and i have got to say that it is a beauty. all the parts except for the handles are cast Iron or metal. it is a beautiful plane and works great. thanks for the post.

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2688 days


#3 posted 2306 days ago

SST is all over the differential diagnosis. (the bakelite knob is a dead giveaway for WWII era Stanleys -Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition we’ll be using that brass for other purposes!).

Patrick Leach’s Blood and Gore page lives here (right after you promise not to rip off his research to sell your plane on eBay).

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2913 posts in 2520 days


#4 posted 2306 days ago

Thanks guys.

Doug – I promise!

I’ve gone to the site—- but can’t find the one you are thinking this plane is. The plane body says Bailey, the lever cap says Stanley. It is marked as a 5 1/4. I don’t see a casting date on it.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

780 posts in 2819 days


#5 posted 2306 days ago

There’s another site that might help. Again, I’m not savvy on adding links, but the site is www.hyperkitten.com
Click on old tools and then plane type study. You can use it to type your plane.
It’s not a perfect system as there were variants and sometimes previous owners just mixed up parts, but regardless, the Stanley/Bailey planes are hard to beat. Enjoy! -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

1011 posts in 2718 days


#6 posted 2306 days ago

Betsy, nice work. I’ve got a few ebay specials that are waiting in the corner and one of mine happens to be WWII era with the bakelite knob. I learned something about the planes from that era. Although they kept the brass for bullets they didn’t skimp on the casting. Often, the shoulders of these planes are thicker than their predecessors. Thus, making them a little heavier which can help with chatter on the trickier species.

Have fun in your class at Mehler’s school! I look forward to a report. :)

-- Jeff, St. Paul, MN

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12260 posts in 2722 days


#7 posted 2294 days ago

Well done. Glad to see you put it to use.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2688 days


#8 posted 2294 days ago

Oooh, Betsy it’s a junior jack...

Good score!

Here is the flowchart, that may make things easier to scope out (attributed to Roger K. Smith, Thom Trail and others).

Dandling that picture even managed to draw WayneC into a post. Good work. We haven’t seen enough of him around here of late.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2913 posts in 2520 days


#9 posted 2293 days ago

Thanks Wayne—- glad to see on the site again!

Thanks for the website Doug—- very interesting reading. I really had no idea what I have. Now that I’ve got it sharpened up I’m sure I’ll use it more.

Thanks again.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2098 posts in 2353 days


#10 posted 2155 days ago

Betsy,
Looks like I bought almost the same plane as you (albeight accidentally). I was bidding on a #7 and the seller was also offering a #5. I picked it up at the same time because the shipping for an additional plane was free. I’m a bit disappointed because the front knob has a crack. I was also a bit disappointed because the very confusing research I’ve done seemed to indicate the WWII planes (mine has a bakelight knob too which also was hard to tell from the photos) were the start of Stanley’s decline, but everything here seems to indicate that it should still be awfully good. I think the best evidence is the photo of the board you cleaned up. Thanks for posting this thread. Its already a help for me.

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