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Woodworking as Therapy #7: Frustration does not equal therapy :-(

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Blog entry by Betsy posted 11-20-2011 05:25 AM 5120 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Moving along on my serving tray - but have question Part 7 of Woodworking as Therapy series Part 8: Sanding done -- and found my camera! »

Frustrated—- can’t find my camera to show my issues—rats and double rats.

First I still can’t get my handles for my serving tray to come out right – they just don’t fit – arg!

So I start to think to myself—okay Betsy – you just can’t do anything but square things sooooo off I go to my cutting boards. Well that’s not so good either.

I sanded all 6 of my cutting boards—- they feel good to the touch, sanded through 220. But when I put a straight edge across them – they are all dipped in the middle. I did the “run a pencil mark all over the board trick”, ran them through the sander and the pencil marks all go away. So why are my boards cupped?

So I did get some hours in the shop—but I’m frustrated with my results.

If I could spell oh wow is me—- I’d say oh wow is me. :-(

Thanks for listening – or reading.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine



9 comments so far

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

2682 posts in 2588 days


#1 posted 11-20-2011 01:00 PM

I’m with you Betsy! lately it seems no time on my projects is worthwhile since all I’m doing is trying to fix what appears to be an impossible problem. Keep thinking on it! you’ll figure it out :) and it’s “Oh woe is me.” :) Sorry I can’t help with your cupping issue – I would think planning would be the solution. Hopefully help will soon be on the way!

Becky

-- Beka/Becky - aspiring jill of all trades, still learning to not read the directions.

View HamS's profile

HamS

1809 posts in 1856 days


#2 posted 11-20-2011 01:09 PM

Betsy, It is better to find the wow in life than the woe. What is the grain orientation of the cutting board. It sounds to me like the planer is making the board parallel but not taking the dip out.

-- Haming it up in the 'bash.

View HamS's profile

HamS

1809 posts in 1856 days


#3 posted 11-20-2011 01:27 PM

Just looked at your tray design and I am not sure how big a gap you are fighting but a curve will take up more space than an angled straight cut. If the curved peice fits in the slot, there has to be a gap somewhere unless the curve straightens right where itgoes through the slot, or the slot has a curve in it. It does not have to be very big to be a noticable gap when you are working with fine wood.

-- Haming it up in the 'bash.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2724 posts in 2899 days


#4 posted 11-20-2011 02:08 PM

Betsy,
Perfection is over-rated… go for the look and feel of good wood… and the therapy woodworking provides ;-)
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#5 posted 11-20-2011 04:04 PM

Betsy,

Was gonna give you a “woe” pun but Becky and Ham beat me to the punch so…

Not sure why your cutting boards are bowed but they must be thin enough that they’re flexing when going through the sander from the roller presure. You’ll need to get one side truly flat to resolve the problem. I’d build a sanding “sled” and put the cup down with shims to support the bowed area and sand the convex side up until the “hump” in it was gone, then take the board off the sled and sand the other side until the high sides are even with the concave center. Hopefully you won’t have to take off too much more thickness to correct the problem.

And remember that in real therapy, not all sessions are fun…

Hope things take a turn for the better in the shop. In the meantime, take one beautiful piece of wood and stare at it until you can see what it can become in your mind’s eye…

And please remember…

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View lew's profile

lew

11347 posts in 3222 days


#6 posted 11-20-2011 05:04 PM

Sounds like we have been sharing the same type of days!

When I made some end grain cutting boards, they bowed from the heat built up during the sanding. When they cooled down they seemed to flatten out. I did elevate them on some corner block and put a weight in the middle to help the process.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3363 days


#7 posted 11-21-2011 02:12 AM

thanks for the responses folks.

Ham – all the boards are end grain.

Herb – a sled seems like a plausible solution. I’m going to have to look at that.

Lew – heat build up – hadn’t thought of that.

I’ve spent the day doing fudge today for our company holiday party tomorrow.

I just went out to the shop and did the “rock” test. four of the six boards are rock solid on the saw’s table top with zero bounce. The other two have just a tiny bit of rock. So I think I’m going to take a lesson in this—- have a sled ready, and don’t let the heat build up.

I really need to find my camera so I can show my gap issue on the tray – but for now I’m putting the tray aside to keep my irritation level low!

I’m really enjoying being back in the shop—- but I am finding that I’ve forgotten a lot that I took for granted before—-

Ellen has it exactly right—perfection is overrated. Once I get the cutting boards finished, wrapped up and given away I bet they’ll all be perfect. :-)

thanks to all of you.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2326 days


#8 posted 11-21-2011 02:21 AM

Besides, fudge tastes bettter than sawdust.

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3363 days


#9 posted 11-21-2011 02:42 AM

Especially my fudge. I’m the fudge lady. One time a year I’m a great cook!

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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