LumberJocks

I humbly submit my application for "Plane" Idiot of this small village of ours

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Betsy posted 11-20-2007 06:44 AM 998 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ok—- It’s been a while since I’ve blogged on my hand plane syndrome. I’ve been playing with them and getting to know a little bit about them. But I’m going to submit a few questions with pictures to hopefully make me understand how these wonderful little devices work.

But before that—- I am reading Garrett Hack – the Handplane Book. It’s an excellent read. I’m a skimmer the first time I read through a book like this——I pick up the highlights and go back and read some more. So far though I have to say this is a real keeper. The only thing I can say bad about this book as that the publisher got a page out of order but other than that it’s a good book.

ok – so back to my application. of course one of the first things after flattening, sharpening etc. is putting the plane back together. I’ve gotten over that hurdle. i was never good with mechanics – despite remodeling houses I’ve always struggled with these little things (confession over). But now to the adjustment side of things.

I am working with a Stanley block plane to begin with. My first questions surround the level cap. Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

In Hacks’ book it says that the flat of the cap needs to be flush with the body of the iron just as a typical cap iron would be flush. I understand the reasoning in that without the added support of being flush you can get chatter and not such good results. My question is in the installation. When you have done as you think you should and flattened the cap – when you put it back on – do you first tighten the screw tight and then slide over the lever or should the lever be over to one side or the other as you tighten the screw? Right now I am tightening the screw and then moving the lever over as far as it will go. But I’m beginning to wonder if I should be tightening just a little then move the level over and then finish tigtening the screw. I’m thinking that the screw is not what is giving strength to the iron – its the lever and if I tighten to the point that I can’t move the level then it’s null and void.

Hopefully that makes some sense and one of you can tell me if I’m on the right path to thinking this through or simply not asking the right questions. Some of your plane afficionado’s probably think I’m crazy – hence the Plane Idiot application. I humble myself before you. :-)

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine



5 comments so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3868 days


#1 posted 11-20-2007 06:49 AM

I’ve always tightened the screw like finger tight. (not a two handed turn the screwdriver tight) and then swing the lever to give it a final tighten.

That way if you need to swing the blade to get it straight, it’s just a matter of swinging the lever, change the angle and re-swing the lever.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3364 days


#2 posted 11-20-2007 07:08 AM

Thanks Karson – so essentially the screw is then just a place keeper to get the caps level placed where it should be and to allow for side to side adjustment of the blade.

So question two then – is that on a plane with a dedicated cap iron the theory is that the cap iron is to be anywhere from 1/64 to 1/32 from the back of the cutter’s bevel. Obviously on this block plane the position of the cap lever is well back of that since it is limited to the play in the slop that the screw goes into. So why does making the flat of the level flat keep chatter down if it is so far away from the business end of the cutter.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3868 days


#3 posted 11-20-2007 07:13 AM

Since it is not adjustable it purpose would be to keep the blade from flexing. I would guess since these are smaller planes then you would not be taking massive cuts. That it is more of a finesse cut a few thousands thick.

The getting it flat also keeps the chips from getting between the blade and the cap. If you had gaps it does stick. And when it does that it will usually be sticking out the mouth and not allow the plane to sit flat on the board.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3364 days


#4 posted 11-20-2007 07:17 AM

Makes sense Karson. Thanks. off to la la land. Hope you have a great night.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3868 days


#5 posted 11-20-2007 07:17 AM

You also.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com