LumberJocks

Third day of finger box build - I'd like some confessions of LJ's to soothe my goof

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Blog entry by Betsy posted 11-13-2007 06:56 AM 1472 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So not going to get much done tonight, home late from work, dog needs attention, etc. So now on to what we do have to share wth the lJ universe,Was going to take the suggestion of others and do asecond set of sides as a stack. In theory that would work but my pin was not that long for 4 pieces and 1 backerboard. So I am holding the do over until the weekend. Tonight I forged ahead with making the bottom groove and the groove for the lid.

So now LJer’s – 70 some folks have looked at my little attempt at humility and craziness and maybe have rolled your eyes at me in cyberspace. In reality I hope you’re learing what to do and what not do do from this blog – but I digress ==now I request you look deep in your hearts and confess that you have done the same thing I am about to expose to the WWW

First the cuts – these are some poor shots of the router table set up to route the groove for the bottom panel. It’s not hard, just have to be fuzzy about the travel lenght.
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Any way with the stop blocks set up you can now drill piolet holes at either end then will lift the drilled end off of the left end and bring it back down on the right side and then slide it flat across the talbe.
This is the first pilot hole
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Now a picture to show the cut of the lip groove. The cut is buried in the wood so there is no splitter, I made alarge base pushstick and set up grip tight. The set up worked. Will do essentially the same for the ends,

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Now I’ll give you two chances to see what’s wrong with the pictures:
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Hummmm – you can’t measure two little lines between the two bigs ones either can you??? :-)

So make me feel better and tell me story of measuring wow.

I’m actually not not from where I need to b—-
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Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Ok that’s that for tonight. I expect some confesision when I return. :-)

And this is our bottom groove to accept our bottom.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine



17 comments so far

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 3340 days


#1 posted 11-13-2007 07:22 AM

Okay, just yesterday I put the groove for the bottom panel on the outside of a couple of drawer sides. I can now say with certainty that the bottom panel won’t stay in grooves on the outside of the box.

I’m forever measuring to the wrong side of a full inch – for instance, I’ll want 12&3/8, so I’ll find 12”, then count over 1, 2, 3 eighths and make my cut … except I’ve gone 3/8 the wrong direction, so my part is 11&5/8.

But here’s the one I can’t figure out at all: the other day I made a single cabinet door that was supposed to be 14&7/16×21¾, but when I was done it was 14&3/16×17½! It’s easy to miscalculate rails and come out the wrong width, but the stiles are the height of the door – no calculating, just mark and cut! They were 4¼” off!

Do you feel better?

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3529 days


#2 posted 11-13-2007 07:42 AM

I plan all my box to be 10×12x6. Through miscalculation and error they end up all different sizes (well not actually, but this gentle white lie is closer to the truth than I’d like).
This is the essence of “Bordnerization” in action. Thus every box goes though a mysterious becoming process.

Don’t worry about this Betsy, it’s applied learning. You’ll likely discover new errors as your path unfolds, but you will think twice before making this error again. And so it goes…

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14566 posts in 3531 days


#3 posted 11-13-2007 07:51 AM

I’ve made those project changes a hundred times myself Betsy (notice I did not call them errors). I like to think of it as designing on the fly. As long as the finished project looks good, who will ever know what size you intended it to be.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1789 posts in 3456 days


#4 posted 11-13-2007 08:40 AM

“Project changes”...”Designing on the fly”. Hmmmm! Words of wit from the master. I like it.

I take a lot of pride being able to use some reclaimed maple flooring, but I really have to remill these boards first. And most of the time that means spending hours creating usuable lumber. So when I make my cuts, I try to be as precise as possible. Measure twice, cut once…Right?

A little time ago I was making a simple frame to fit a tacky board for the home office. The plan requires a half lap joint 1” from each end. Both joints are to be cut on the same side. I was very careful to cut precision, tight fitting joints but somehow flipped the board and not only put it on the wrong side, I did the same thing to the other board too!

I took this as a hint that I was tired, shut it all down, grabbed a beer and went inside to watch TV. The next day it was “Project change time” and I was able to salvage the boards, although it meant shrinking the panel an inch.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1789 posts in 3456 days


#5 posted 11-13-2007 08:44 AM

I noticed that you’re getting a lot of “tear-out” on your finger joints. Back your boards up with a piece of scrap and you’ll correct this problem.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

1011 posts in 3559 days


#6 posted 11-13-2007 09:15 AM

Betsy, I confess. I made a similar mistake on this very box design (or a very close cousin). A few of my fingers also did not have a friction fit. But, since there are so many fingers, it came out in the wash as they say… My issue was that I completely blew it on the lid. If I recall, the design is such that lid is flush with the sides at the top. Mine is not flush. It is shy of that by an 1/8th of an inch. I didn’t cut rabbets on the lid to ride in the slots and the lid was the nicest part of the box. I didn’t have another nicely figured piece to replace it. Thus, I had to widen the slots to accommodate the whole lid and the lid ended up riding lower overall. I was a bit miffed with myself. I even made the length of the lid about a 1/4 of an inch too short for my preferences too.

Fear not, practice makes perfect.

-- Jeff, St. Paul, MN

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3361 days


#7 posted 11-13-2007 03:58 PM

Well now I do feel better. The box was easy enough to salvage I just recut the groove for the lid and cut down the sides to match. Looks pretty close to what I intended.

“Applied learning” – I like that.

Dadoo——the back up board will be used in my do-over this weekend. It should make a difference. This box though will get hit a little harder with the sanding block to clear those feathers up.

I did notice on my box when I have it together that I need to make the bottom groove just a tad longer. I still have the set up on the table so I’ll do that before the lid and bottom.

I hope to make the lid and bottom tonight. But we’ll see the creeping crude is going around the office and I’m not feeling well this morning. So my shop time tonight might be turned into reading time instead. We’ll see.

Thanks for looking guys and confessing! Makes me feel better about my goof. It was only a 1/4” but sure made a difference!

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3565 days


#8 posted 11-13-2007 07:05 PM

During a kitchen install, I set the cabinets with the doors off. Then when I went to set the doors with knobs I drilled the knob hole on the wrong side of the most expensive door which was to the pantry. The happy part of the story is that my cabinet rep sent me a new one for free because I told him the truth.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Blake's profile

Blake

3442 posts in 3340 days


#9 posted 11-13-2007 07:40 PM

I do it all the time. What was that saying? “Measure until your fingers bleed, cut once.”

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

View jpw1995's profile

jpw1995

376 posts in 3763 days


#10 posted 11-13-2007 07:51 PM

I’ve never screwed up, ever. Now who wants to buy some ocean front property right here in Kentucky?

-- JP, Louisville, KY

View Brad_Nailor's profile

Brad_Nailor

2539 posts in 3423 days


#11 posted 11-13-2007 08:25 PM

No matter how carefull you think you are, how many times you check and re measure things it is inevetable that you will screw up something. My favorite is I always go to all this trouble arranging grain and picking the best sides of boards…then I machine them and find out i didn’t put the grove/dado/rabbit on the correct side. Or I always think I have enough raw stock machined to do the job (moulding, face frame parts, etc) then to find out I underestimated and now I have to go back and re visit my setups and try to match what I already machined..

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3626 days


#12 posted 11-13-2007 09:15 PM

and all of these experiences are why kids need to be taught woodworking (and other skills) -what a great way to develop patience, perseverance, determination, resiliency, problem-solving skills, back-up planning skills, focus, confidence, self-worth… and so on, and so on, and so on.

When I first started woodworking my first errors were really embarrassing… then they moved to aggrevating and hopefully I will soon get to the “darn, that’s frustrating.. oh well.. next…” stage.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3361 days


#13 posted 11-13-2007 11:06 PM

Your confessions make me feel better! I’ve kind of put myself out there with this blog for all to see my mistakes, and way of doing things, so I’m comforted by your confessions of error, or is that design issues? :-)

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3565 days


#14 posted 11-14-2007 06:05 AM

HA! Gotcha- we were just strokin’ ya. We actually never screwed up! HA! (Yeah Right)

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3529 days


#15 posted 11-15-2007 06:18 PM

Last night (after a totally pleasant surprise phone call from Thos. Angle) I completely boogered everything I touched on a new project. Sometimes you get the bear and sometimes the bear gets you. On days or nights like that you just have to know when enough is enough, turn out the lights and shut the shop door.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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