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Unadvertised advantages to planes

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Blog entry by Betsy posted 10-21-2007 11:55 PM 1183 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Really getting into this plane thing. But I must admit, all of the articles and books I’ve read no one has told me some of these things—- so for those other uninitiated out there:

1) Not only are hand planes quieter than an electric planer—my dog won’t run away with fright.

2) When I can’t get a paper pattern off of the front of a bandsaw box – the block plane makes very quick, clean work of it. No longer will I sand myself silly or berate myself for using a touch to much – removable adhesive spray. Of course, I imagine that paper will dull the blade faster than plain wood—- but who cares—- I’m learning to sharpen.

3) I won’t miss a minute of the Cowboys game while planing. I also don’t have to turn the volume up so my brother in Fargo can hear it. (My neighbors really appreciate this one.)

4) I can do small jobs in my living room——- (I don’t suggest this for those who lives with anyone not as excited about your plane as you are.)

5) I don’t worry about hearing protection——I have some really nice ear muffs—- but I don’t like wearing them. (I never use my electric planer without them – so the hand plane is a big deal here.)

Some nice advantages I’d say.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine



20 comments so far

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3656 days


#1 posted 10-22-2007 12:44 AM

I’ve been spending a bit of time getting more in tune with hand tools, planes being my current focus, and I am finding that, in addition to the things you’ve mentioned (the Cowboys reference notwithstanding…I’m a Packer fan) I am getting a lot more personal satisfaction from the hand planes. I’ve purchased a number of old but serviceable Stanley planes of different sizes and types recently, and the only problem I seem to be having is resisting the urge to become a collector. (I don’t need another hobby/disease)
Using these planes brought back some memories of shop class (about a half a century or so ago) where I learned to square up a board with a plane. It’s taken a bit of practice to be able to do that again, but I’m finding that making shavings is both relaxing and rewarding.
Also, I like using cordless tools. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#2 posted 10-22-2007 01:12 AM

I’m a big Farve fan – except of course when the Packers play the Boys. No one can scramble and make things happen like Farve and you have to admire his “come to work everyday and do his job” attitude.

I know what you mean about the temptation to become a collector. Once you find out how much fun hand tools are, and how much you can do with them—- it’s hard not to want every hand tool you see. I’ve had to cut myself off from buying anything else for a while. It would be nice if I could trade some of my lasagna for tools – but not sure I could get anyone to go for that.

Unfortuantely, I did not get a chance to take shop – thankfully, those schools that still have programs now welcome girls with open arms. I did, however, have the pleasure of watching my Dad work wood. So I’ve been drawing on some of that for my own experience now. I don’t see that as a disadvantage at all though, in fact, it may be a good thing as now I can learn what I want, when I want and not have to worry about grades.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#3 posted 10-22-2007 02:04 AM

Great benefits. The collection urge is difficult to resist. I’m doing my best.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4445 posts in 3423 days


#4 posted 10-22-2007 05:26 AM

Interesting observations, I don’t watch football but I do understand that disease. Ah…...”The Infamous Slippery Slope”.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#5 posted 10-22-2007 06:13 AM

Yes but Thomas it looks like from the picture that you have rescue rope for your slippry slope. My firends not undertand toolbiology and so they are not much hlelp with contol. I wnet t dinner wth a firend and told her my delimina of not having a good comeral she gave me in impression if I wait until
Christmas I just might get one – her family always takes care of me snce I have no family in Texas.

Will see what happens.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3449 days


#6 posted 10-22-2007 12:31 PM

I have just found a book that I thought I had lost. It has to be the best book on handplanes I have ever seen. The author doesn’t leave anything out.

Everything you ever wanted to know!

It’s called “The Handplane Book” by Garret Hack. Here’s an Amazon link. For less than $17 you can’t beat it.

Check it out.

http://www.amazon.com/Handplane-Book-Garrett-Hack/dp/1561587125/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-0441505-4653738?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1193048657&sr=8-1

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3621 days


#7 posted 10-22-2007 12:37 PM

Wayne, you are resisting? That’s scary.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3656 days


#8 posted 10-22-2007 10:40 PM

Betsy, I know what you mean about watching your dad. I always did real well in shop class because my dad taught me most of the things before I took it in class. I know lots of guys looked at shop class as a screw-off hour, or a way out of real “book learnin” stuff, but I liked it because I really liked woodworking as a skill. I always find interesting the amount of things we absorbed from our parents without realizing it at the time. It’s too bad I didn’t figure this out while my folks were alive so I could have told them.
I know I’ve said this before sometime ago on this site, that when I’m working on my dad’s (still call it my dad’s…isn’t that interesting?) 55 year old Shopsmith, I can almost feel him looking over my shoulder, telling me to pay attention so I don’t cut off my finger.
I suppose that’s why working with the planes and other hand tools is such good “therapy work”.
By the way, if you get tired of playing with planes, chisels are fun, too. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#9 posted 10-22-2007 11:43 PM

I think good hand saws are on my list. I passed on a couple recently that I should not have….

Yes, Deb I must resist the assimilation. That is why I drove for a couple of hours last night and bought a Radial Arm saw…. lol I had been resisting for at least a year and failed. It is Blake’s fault….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#10 posted 10-23-2007 03:48 AM

I’ve always heard Blake was at fault. Now I know where to find him!

SST – it never ceases to amaze me what my Dad taught me without really teaching me. My Dad seldom strung two words together – I always thought he was painfully shy, now I recognize it as measuring his words. He was a very bright man who I miss dearly. I really cherish my memories of “Elizabeth (he hated the name Betsy) come out here and hold this whatever” and the trips to the auto parts store were terrific fun. Of course, looking back the lumberyard was the pinnacle of fun——- the old man there always, and I mean always, had a penny for the gumball machine for me. Now any time I have a gumball I think of Dad and that old man.

I had a Shopsmith as my first real tool. I bought a house that needed, to say the least, to be completely redone. It was a bit like having eyes bigger than your stomach. Learned some real good lessons on my Mark V. My “shop” was the spare bedroom – whenever I wanted to cut anything long I had to open the window and fix the smith so that the cut would end before the edge of the window. Of course I would not think of doing a crosscut like that now—I didn’t know better then.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#11 posted 10-23-2007 04:55 AM

Gary – I just looked up that link. The intro to the book looks like what I can use to learn from. Thanks for the tip.

I just found out another unadvertised advantage to hand tools. No need to worry about long sleeves getting caught in a fast moving machine. This becomes quite obvious now that we’ve had a bit of a cold snap (by Texas standards).

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3621 days


#12 posted 10-23-2007 04:31 PM

“the old man” .. growing up there was a “corner store” a couple of roads away. (rural area). My uncle took me there a lot to buy a pop or bag of cheesies. “we’re just heading over to the old man’s”... I never thought of him as old or anything; to me it was just the name of the store: “the old man’s”
hadn’t thought of that store in a long, long time.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

788 posts in 3656 days


#13 posted 10-23-2007 06:10 PM

I just did a search on ebay for “the Handplane Book” and found a seller with several available @ $9.97. I couldn’t pass up that price. – SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#14 posted 10-23-2007 06:14 PM

The other real good one is Making and Mastering Woodworking Planes by David Finck. It not only covers information about how to make planes and assocated tools, but how to sharpen, tune and use them. It is $12.21 on Amazon and can probably be found for less.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3357 days


#15 posted 10-23-2007 07:16 PM

You guys are terrible——the slippery slope has struck—- got both books!

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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