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Shaker Cherry Nightstand - Handtool heavy #3: Part 3: Mortise & Tenon

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Blog entry by Bertha posted 03-07-2011 02:24 AM 2408 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Part 2- top & aprons Part 3 of Shaker Cherry Nightstand - Handtool heavy series Part 4: Step 4: working out the drawer supports »

Time to mortise & tenon the aprons. I considered doing this by hand but I’ll save that challenge for another day. These are cut with a tenon jig on a dedicated old tablesaw.

Here are the tenoned aprons off the jig. A little Stanley bullnose is investigating.

I’ll shoulder the tenons by hand:

I’m going to dovetail the upper drawer rail and tenon the lower drawer rail. When cutting half blinds that will be relatively hidden, I like to extend the handcut so that it remains visible. I also like to leave marking/mortising gauge line visible. It reminds me of the build process.

And hand chop a bunch of mortises:

I’m fizzled out with all that chopping & will resume later this week. I need to finish chopping the mortises, fit the drawer guide & start working on the drawer. Thanks for looking!

After speaking with Dennis, I moved to a more substantial chisel to complete the mortises:

Ready to measure for the drawer support:

Now handplaning the lower drawer supports paired with the #7:

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog



8 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2578 days


#1 posted 03-07-2011 10:07 AM

:-) half and half …eh

like your mallet handle , what brand is that mortiss cheisel

have a great day
Dennis

View ratchet's profile

ratchet

1389 posts in 3249 days


#2 posted 03-07-2011 02:35 PM

OMG…you have a dedicated tablesaw & Jig to do tenons. Looks like a worker too. Nice work.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#3 posted 03-07-2011 03:09 PM

Hey Dennis, that mallet’s a homemade job, head of ash; handle of figured maple, key of walnut. It’s my main chisel hammer & with the square swelled handle, I can use it without looking. The 1/4” mortise chisel is a T.H. Witherby with a dark rosewood socket handle & leather shock absorber. I bought it because it was long; it may actually be a little too long!

Ratchet, that’s an old $99 delta that I just couldn’t throw away. It was worthless, but while trying to align it, I stumbled luckily upon dead perpendicular. I jigged it up with the tenon jig & just let it be. I’ll build a proper tenon jig for my main saw one of these days.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

11148 posts in 2552 days


#4 posted 03-07-2011 08:39 PM

I also love the mallet.
Smile,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#5 posted 03-07-2011 08:50 PM

Thanks Mads, it’s my favorite.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2578 days


#6 posted 03-07-2011 09:05 PM

Bertha I don´t know if it can be bought new its look like a new mortisser
but I think its a sash mortiss cheisel you got there since it is so long
try to compare it to a Ray Isle mortisse that is more the size for furnituremaking
does your mortisse has little slant side´s too like the Ray Isle as they all had in the old days
compare to now where most of them has 90 degree sides to the back

Dennis

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2156 days


#7 posted 03-07-2011 09:29 PM

No Dennis, this is definitely an old variety that I refurbed & fitted with a new socket. I think it would definitely qualify as a sash mortise chisel, given it’s length. It definitely has a small relief on the sides which doesn’t seem to aid much with chip clearance. It does seem to help the chisel from getting stuck, as Ray Iles claims. I can’t comment on the original primary bevel, as the chisel was found in poor shape. Mine’s ground to a 30 degree primary, which I’m told is too large. I usually choose my mortise/tenon width based upon what mortise chisel I’m anxious to use, rather than some formula based on the thickness of stock (1/3, etc.). For real bashing, I prefer the short, squat picksticker varieties but I was anxious to use this chisel! I’ve got two of Ray’s chisels in 3/8 & 1/2. They are exceptional chisels indeed!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2578 days


#8 posted 03-07-2011 11:58 PM

you deffently have a point when kit comes to choose the cheisel for the job
when you think of the old guys 100-200 years back I don´t think they had more than one or two
mortiss cheisels and just used what they had in the toolbox
compared to what people do to day when the they deside to buy a cheisel they want all
of them so they have a complete set of mortiss , pairing , sash or bench cheisel or what ever
they deside to have of tool ´s
I think we are spoiled today with the options of tool compared to back then

I still like your mortiss and the shape of the handle is one I think you nailed from what I have seen
an old galoot shipright use on a picture ( look at bob Smalsers blogs on http://www.wkfinetools.com/
a real galoot site )

take care
Dennis

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