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Cabinet/Bookshelves #4: Don't wanna come "un-hinged"...

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Blog entry by Bermuda_Les posted 11-03-2016 12:09 PM 846 reads 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Can it be? I'm actually back on this project? Part 4 of Cabinet/Bookshelves series Part 5: The Doors... (no not the group!) »

So I’ve decided to tackle the doors for the cabinets next in this project. And while I’m at it, I’ll do both doors necessary for this cabinet/bookcase.

I took down a nice piece of mahogany, and it’s big enough that I can get two doors out of it. But before I start ripping the stiles and rails, I gave some thought to the type of hinges I would be using. After some consideration, I think European concealed hinges will work better in this application than the standard butt hinges.

European cup hinges are a breeze to install, once you have made all the fiddly measurements in half millimeters. It’s a real nuisance to set out all the marks where to drill the cup and screw holes, but once you’ve done that the rest is easy. So based on that, I decided to make jig to make the placement of the hinge as easy as the installation.

I decided that a good placement for the hinges would be 4” from the top and bottom (there’s seems to be no consensus on the best placement of cabinet hinges), so I”ll make my jig 8” long, with the holes at 4”, so I can align the jig with the top or bottom of the door, and the placement will be spot on in both cases.

So I cut a small piece of mahogany 1/2” x 3/4” x 8”, along with a small piece of yellow hard foam 2” x 8”, I have kicking around for just these purposes. Could have used 1/4” ply, but yellow is so easy for my old eyes to see!!!

I then laid out the screw spacing to secure the yellow foam to the mahogany, and attached with small brass screws.

I marked the jig at the 4” line, and carefully laid out the 20.5mm point for the center of the hinge cup.

Next I cut a piece of scrap to test my jig cup hole placement.

Then I cut the scrap to make a “door” piece and a “frame” piece, and placed the jig on the door piece and marked the cup position.

I then drilled the cup using the point laid out by the jig. Put the hinge in the cup, squared it up and marked the screw holes on the door piece. I then measured these and then transferred the measurements to the jig.

I then drilled the screw holes in the door piece using the jig, and screwed the hinge in place. A perfect fit!

I then marked the frame piece where the hinge would go (in practice this won’t be necessary as the door placement will determine this), and attached the door to the frame. It worked perfectly.

Now that the jig is set up it will be simple to just align the jig with the top or bottom of my doors and mark the hinge placement. Easy peasy! I’ll sand the mahogany next in preparation for cutting the stiles and rails this weekend. See you then.

-- Making sawdust in Bermuda. It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!



2 comments so far

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

4217 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 11-03-2016 06:31 PM

Looking good Les,

The hinges are quite flexible and can be used outside the “box” as well.

Some time ago I wanted a Low Japanese Desk with no visible hinges and used them there in a modified form.
The table itself got dumped due to me no being able to produce a “Henry Ford” finish I wanted but the hinges worked OK.

-- Regards Robert

View Bermuda_Les's profile

Bermuda_Les

152 posts in 985 days


#2 posted 11-04-2016 12:53 PM



Looking good Les,

The hinges are quite flexible and can be used outside the “box” as well.

Some time ago I wanted a Low Japanese Desk with no visible hinges and used them there in a modified form.
The table itself got dumped due to me no being able to produce a “Henry Ford” finish I wanted but the hinges worked OK.

- robscastle

Hi Rob,

Wow!! I read the whole thread about your table. What a time you had with that joint! Ingenious solution at the end, and I loved the photos showing the offset issues. How crazy. But all’s well that ends well. It just goes to prove making a jig is worth the effort.

Les

-- Making sawdust in Bermuda. It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!

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