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New Workshop #1: I so don't want to do this...

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Blog entry by Bermuda_Les posted 07-06-2015 12:25 PM 1360 reads 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of New Workshop series Part 2: Fixing the floor... »

But unfortunatelty (or fortunately – depending on how you look at it) I have sold my house where my workshop was. So I had to empty twelve years of “stuff” out of my old workshop and on to the porch of the house where I live now and set about recreating my worksop.

The house where I live now, doesn’t have a garage that I could convert into a workshop, and no spare rooms I could commandeer, so my only choice was to build a workshop. I had two choices: Build from scratch with wood, or buy prefabricated. Building from scratch, while very appealing, is really not an option for me, as the cost would be astronomical, with our lumber being double or triple that of US prices, and my mobility doesn’t lend itself to that sort project anymore.

So that left purchasing a prefab unit. With the humidity and salt in the air here, a metal shed is out of the question, it will have rusted away in five years, so vinyl shed it is. I looked at a lot of sheds/garages, and finally settled on a Duramax 10’ x 15’ Vinyl Garage, similar to the photo below, but not as long and no windows.

In Bermuda as long as the structure does not have a permanent foundation, you don’t require a building permit. So a concrete slab was out, but I chose to use fifteen concrete step pads 12” x 12” as the piles on which to set my 4” x 4” wolmanized treated pitch pine beams.

I need to give credit to my two tireless assistants, my son Dave, and my stepson Aaron, who always come through when I need them. Without them, no shed would be built. After much huffing and puffing, and drinking of Heinekens, the beams were finally leveled and where we wanted them.

Once the beams were locked together, the foundation frame for the shed was put on the beams and then screwed down.

And finally, the interlacing supports for the foundation frame, and the base track for the walls of the garage. That was enough for one weekend, working in 90°F heat. We’ll tackle the walls next weekend, and depending on weather we may even be able to start on the roof.

Again, thanks to my assistants, you were troopers!!!

QUESTION FOR THE LUMBERJOCKS COMMUNITY: I am going to need to reinforce the vinyl walls of this garage in order that I can hang stuff on them (tools and the like). If anyone has any ideas on that subject, I’d love to hear them. Thanks.

-- Making sawdust in Bermuda. It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!



5 comments so far

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2632 posts in 2570 days


#1 posted 07-06-2015 04:27 PM

I’d recommend placing wood studs on the floor at the joist locations for support. If you attach to the plastic, you will need a zillion fasteners to spread the load so that it doesn’t bend too much, but any weight cantilevered out will probably cause the wall to bow anyway. Perhaps another option is to make a folding cabinet. I’ve seen them in 4 foot widths, with multiple nesting doors so that the entire space is filled with tools, and accessible by folding out the doors. I’ve seen them around, but my search on LJ comes up with bupkis.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#2 posted 07-06-2015 04:33 PM

You could use wooden framing in a dimension you are comfortable with Les. The framing can be screwed or bolted through drilled holes from the outside of the vinyl walls and covered with peg board or some other lightweight platters. If they are anchored in the floor beams the walls should be self supporting weight wise. The vinyl walls would just hold it upright. Maybe someone will have a better idea, but that’s about all I can come up with. I can relate to you not wanting to build from scratch. I did my present shop in 2002 when I was 62, but I couldn’t manage that now.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Bermuda_Les's profile

Bermuda_Les

123 posts in 690 days


#3 posted 07-06-2015 06:33 PM

Thanks for the ideas guys. Yes I’m 70 this year and I’m not as spry as I used to be. I saw something on a YouTube video by Jay Bates an LJ Member that showed a metal shed that had been framed inside with 2” x 4”s. Although the video was showing something else, the framing caught my eye. I’m not sure though if the vinyl will hold the framing.

Les

-- Making sawdust in Bermuda. It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!

View GnarlyErik's profile

GnarlyErik

255 posts in 1595 days


#4 posted 07-06-2015 06:38 PM

When we bought our new house my wife strongly objected to adding permanent shelves or wall attachments of any kind in our garage. This solution worked very well for me: I got my hands on some recycled wooden kitchen cabinets – two units about about 6 feet long by 32 inches high by 2 feet wide each, from a remodel salvage. To these I added a sheet of 1/2” ply as a back above the countertop, and allowed its ends to protrude about a foot beyond the ends of the countertop at each end. Plywood ‘bulkheads’ were added across the ends of the countertop and provided with and end plate on the face side of the countertop, making an enclosed end space at each end which can be used for shelving or whatever. In my case I drilled holes and inserted 1/2” steel pipe cross bars which are used for clamp storage which has worked out very well.

Several shelves were added above the countertop supported at the ends by the bulkheads. All the material was cheap leftover stuff or ‘C’ grade plywood. I don’t see why even particle board would not work. The front edges of the shelving are reinforced by a strip of 1” x 2” to provide stiffness. – see photos – pardon the ‘business’ of my lack of organization!

The entire affair is self-supporting and has the advantage of being movable if necessary. I made a quick sketch to help you understand. I suppose your biggest challenge will be to find some sort of suitable counter cabinets. Whatever you do, good luck!

-- Candy is dandy and rum sure is fun, but wood working is the best high for me!

View Bermuda_Les's profile

Bermuda_Les

123 posts in 690 days


#5 posted 08-17-2015 12:10 PM


The entire affair is self-supporting and has the advantage of being movable if necessary. I made a quick sketch to help you understand. I suppose your biggest challenge will be to find some sort of suitable counter cabinets. Whatever you do, good luck!

- GnarlyErik

Thank you Gnarly Erik for that very detailed explanation. It was most insightful.

Les

-- Making sawdust in Bermuda. It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!

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