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1950's DeWalt MMB 23 RAS #15: New table!

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Blog entry by Beginningwoodworker posted 06-14-2011 03:25 AM 2722 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: Stand update! Part 15 of 1950's DeWalt MMB 23 RAS series Part 16: Top is finish! »

I am going to start from stratch with a new table for my RAS. I am using 6/4 Poplar, the table is 36’‘x13’’. The guys told me at DeWalt fourm what machine screw size I need. I found two holes in rails for to install the machine screws. The size are 5/16” 18.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker



20 comments so far

View Bill J. Griffin's profile

Bill J. Griffin

92 posts in 1295 days


#1 posted 06-14-2011 04:08 AM

Nice RAS! Why did you decide to use poplar and what thickness?
Looks nice tho. I’ve still got to make the table for mine.

-- Shop's too small :( ... hey the decks pretty big :)!!!

View lew's profile

lew

10152 posts in 2500 days


#2 posted 06-14-2011 04:12 AM

Looks like a nice heavy table, CJ

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View matt garcia's profile

matt garcia

1834 posts in 2416 days


#3 posted 06-14-2011 04:18 AM

SWEET!!!

-- Matt Garcia Wannabe Period Furniture Maker, Houston TX

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2417 days


#4 posted 06-14-2011 04:31 AM

Its more stable than plywood. Its about 1 1/4’’ thick

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View auggy53's profile

auggy53

159 posts in 1424 days


#5 posted 06-14-2011 05:51 AM

nice looking saw , i have a 60’s something that needs a new table . maybe soon.

-- rick

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2472 days


#6 posted 06-14-2011 05:19 PM

don’t forget the sacrificial top!

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1918 days


#7 posted 06-14-2011 05:38 PM

Wow, Charles.

It’s almost too pretty to cover with a sacrificial top, but … I gotta’ agree … you kinda’ DO want to do it.

-- -- Neil

View Bill J. Griffin's profile

Bill J. Griffin

92 posts in 1295 days


#8 posted 06-14-2011 07:28 PM

How thick should a sacrificial top be? 1/4, 1/2?

-- Shop's too small :( ... hey the decks pretty big :)!!!

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1918 days


#9 posted 06-14-2011 07:32 PM

I’d go with 1/4”, and then … when you have your saw fully aligned … cut a 1/8” deep groove into the sacrificial top, through your fence, and along the length of the radial arm (a crosscut).

I think it was “Mr. Sawdust” who recommended that you continue that cut, swiveling the motor/arbor at the end OF the crosscut, and then doing a push-plow cut, all the way back TO your fence.

I did this on mine. Made a WHOPPER of a mess, but … turned out pretty well ;-)

-- -- Neil

View Bill J. Griffin's profile

Bill J. Griffin

92 posts in 1295 days


#10 posted 06-14-2011 08:06 PM

Thanks Niel. :)

-- Shop's too small :( ... hey the decks pretty big :)!!!

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2417 days


#11 posted 06-14-2011 08:38 PM

Yes its to pretty to cover up!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10327 posts in 1363 days


#12 posted 06-14-2011 08:54 PM

Cut into it! No sacrificial top! Doing that is like putting a bed liner in your new pickup – Why? So the next guy can have a nice new truck? :-)

Let it accumulate all the character it wants, I say. But, alas, mine is a minority opinion… But, Nice Top and Well Done!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5578 posts in 2330 days


#13 posted 06-14-2011 09:03 PM

I can’t see does it have a nice saw safety guard that tends to be the problem with these old saws no guard .May it’s just my eyes or a bad photo angle but I didn’t see one. Alistair ps otherwise nice piece of history

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1438 days


#14 posted 06-14-2011 09:27 PM

Alistair, my Craftsman has a guard that you mainually lift over your short fence. It drops by gravity behind the fence and keeps the saw from moving foreward. I actually feel pretty safe using it (which is probably a bad thing) but it’s true; it’s coming right at you, spinning loudly. ;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2472 days


#15 posted 06-15-2011 02:52 PM

While you can do what you want, but the sacrificial top is not to preserve the looks. It should work just like a zero clearance insert on a table saw. After you make several angle cuts (or have made 90 degree cuts for a long time) the kerf you cut into the top will gradually widen. When this happens, you will start to get tear out and/or lose a bit of precision. If you install a sacrificial top, you can just replace it and still have a wonderful and flat table top. If you don’t, you will need to rebuild the whole thing all over again. If it were me, I’d spend $5 now and save a bunch of time and money in the future. I’m going to put a sacrificial top on the MDF table I’m building, so this really has nothing to do with preserving looks.

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