LumberJocks

1950's DeWalt MMB 23 RAS #12: Building a RAS table?

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Beginningwoodworker posted 03-01-2011 01:37 AM 5339 reads 2 times favorited 35 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Roller bearings need adjusting? Part 12 of 1950's DeWalt MMB 23 RAS series Part 13: Started to work on a RAS cabinet! »

I am trying to figure out how to go about building the RAS Table? I dont have Mr Sawdust book as I ran out of funds. So I am trying to wing it.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker



35 comments so far

View Eric in central Florida's profile

Eric in central Florida

3677 posts in 2330 days


#1 posted 03-01-2011 01:43 AM

You can join my “out of funds club” !
(It’s coming along good Charles.)

-- All glory comes from daring to begin.

View Ed's profile

Ed

33 posts in 1412 days


#2 posted 03-01-2011 02:52 AM

Here is a page of how to, that I used for my table. Hope it helps you…I cut three pieces for the top from a 2’ X 4’ sheet of 3/4” MDF. Since the old top was 32” long I decided to make the new one the same as space is limited.
The main section is 17 1/2” wide, the fillers are 1 1/2” and 5 1/2” wide, the panel was actually 24 1/2” wide, otherwise the main section would have been only 17”. There was not enough material to make the 1 1/2” strip for the fence so I used some plywood that I had.

To locate the main table I removed the blade guard and swung the motor to the in-rip position with the pointer at 0 on the in-rip scale and locked the motor in position. I raised the blade so the table would just pass under it and aligned the edge of the table with the inside of the blade. I placed a straight edge against the inside of the blade and lined up the table so it was parallel to the blade. I then marked the position to drill the holes for the front two mounting bolts. I selected a position in the center of the slot nearest the end of the brackets. I then removed the table, drilled a 1/8” hole at each mark, then from the top I drilled 5/8” holes 3/8 of an inch deep for the bolt heads, then drilled 1/4” holes for the bolts. I then mounted the table to the brackets with 1/4” X 1 1/4” carriage bolts.

To double check if the table was level, I removed the blade and turned the motor on end so the shaft was pointing down toward the table, with the motor fully extended to the outside and the arm at 90 degrees I lowered the shaft down on to a plywood block until it just fit snuggly between the end of the shaft and the table, then checked it at the inside edge of the table. I then rotated the arm to 45 degrees and checked the inside and outside of the table edges, then the opposite side. I was lucky the top was actually level despite the makeshift brackets.
I then replaced the blade and the guard, inserted my new fence and the two filler strips, plugged the saw in and selected a decent looking scrap 1 X 6 and made a test cut. I set the height of the blade just above the table so it would not cut all the way through the material. I checked the cut with a square that I know is accurate, tweaked the position of the table by tightening the clamp on the side that had to be moved back and checked again and continued in this manner until the cut was perfectly square.
I then measured from the outer edge of the table to a spot toward the inside edge of the table from underneath to position a hole that would be drilled through the metal in the support between the slots. With a square on the top I marked the positions of the two holes, drilled a 3/8” deep 5/8” holes, then 1/4” holes through both the top and the support bracket. This was so the top would not slide out of true when the clamps were tightened to hold the fillers and the fence in the future.

-- Ed Pa.

View lew's profile

lew

10168 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 03-01-2011 02:55 AM

CJ,
I used to have a craftsman radial arm. Here is a link to the assembly diagrams- they may give you some ideas.

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/part-model/Craftsman-Parts/Saw-Parts/Model-11329410/0247/0744500?blt=05

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View jack1's profile

jack1

1953 posts in 2782 days


#4 posted 03-01-2011 04:55 AM

I’ve seen some factory models that were also long like for modern mitre saws… Just an idea.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1929 days


#5 posted 03-01-2011 05:06 AM

Charles:

The Mr. Sawdust table is 32” wide x 17” deep. I used two pieces of 3/4” hardwood plywood for mine, though he recommends either that, marine plywood, or (not his recommendation, I think, but a great idea) MDF.

I’d use MDF.

You cut dadoes in the top AND bottom piece, and then put bar stock, lengthwise, in the dadoes.

Then, you sandwich the bar stock, IN the dadoes, between the two sheets, and glue them together with construction adhesive.

You set HEAVY weights on top, and let the glue dry for 24hrs.

Then, mark and drill and counterbore your holes, to allow your fasteners to attach the table to the RAS frame.

After attaching the table, you cut a sheet of 1/4” plywood 32” wide x 17-3/4” deep. This gives you 1/8” clear at the back (leaving a sawdust channel by the fence) and at the front.

I tacked my sacrificial top down with brads, but some people recommend using rubber cement and counter-sunk brass tacks (in case you DO happen to hit one with the blade).

It makes for an excellent table.

I ran the bar stock the wrong way, by accident (no big deal), but … here’s what mine looks like:

You then have to add back boards that will run between the rear bolts and the fence. You screw the bolts in, to tighten the back boards up against the fence, and the fence up against the table.

This keeps everything snug and square.

My fence is 2-1/2” high.

If you want to go this way, and need any other measurements, let me know.

Incidentally, I just ordered all new fasteners, today, for the table. I’m using 5/16-18TPI set screws and socket head cap screws, in zinc-coated alloy steel. Jam nuts, flat washers, and lock washers will keep everything in place.

-- -- Neil

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2428 days


#6 posted 03-01-2011 05:18 AM

Neil I think my table is to short.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1861 days


#7 posted 03-01-2011 06:05 AM

Charles, Take a look at Patrons RAS table. Lots of ideas there. Rand

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2428 days


#8 posted 03-01-2011 06:27 PM

Ok!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1929 days


#9 posted 03-01-2011 06:59 PM

Rand is REALLY right.

If I were smarter, and took better notes, and took a bunch of my OWN pictures, AND … if he let me [;-)] ... I would have built exactly what Patron built.

[Actually, if he didn’t have Buddy the Fearsome WatchDog … I would have thrown HIS table in the back of my car (LOL !)]

David’s table looks like … it makes it EASY to do pretty much everything you WILL do, with an RAS.

AND … he stuck a darned router underneath one END of it. How smart was that ???

The Mr. Sawdust table, for me, was simple, though. The instructions were right there, for me to follow.

But if you can look at David’s pictures, and simply build what HE did … you would definitely be happy with the outcome !

-- -- Neil

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2428 days


#10 posted 03-01-2011 07:06 PM

I will take a look at David table.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1448 days


#11 posted 03-25-2011 06:21 PM

When I think RAS, I think Neil^ above. I can’t stop staring at your SAW, ignoriing the table. I wish you the best!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2428 days


#12 posted 03-25-2011 06:23 PM

Al, I love my RAS! :)

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1929 days


#13 posted 03-25-2011 06:25 PM

By the way, Charles .... a couple things come to mind:

1) At first, I was trying to make my table level, but … realized … it’s not supposed to be “level.” It’s supposed to be flat, and parallel to the radial arm, and the plane that the motor/yoke travels in. Duh !

2) I have a Harbor Freight dial indicator and magnetic base. I stuck the magnetic base on the underside of my motor, and …. using the dial indicator … swung the radial arm every which way, AND moved the motor all up and down the travel OF the radial arm. THAT was how I found high spots, low spots, and which way to tilt my mounting struts.

Made it VERY easy, and my table is now VERY flat !

Keep us posted, huh ?

-- -- Neil

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2428 days


#14 posted 03-25-2011 06:45 PM

I will Neil, I am thinking about screwing my table into the rails?

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1448 days


#15 posted 03-25-2011 06:48 PM

I bought that MasterPlate after someone’s advice, I think it may have been Neil. For $50, I think it’s a good investment, especially if this isn’t your last vintage tool.
BWW: I love mine too! I’m manufacturing excuses to use it & my cross clut sled is looking at me condescendingly; screw him, I made him; I can ignore him.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

showing 1 through 15 of 35 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase