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Learning from errors

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Blog entry by BB1 posted 03-19-2018 11:51 PM 542 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I was looking at the latest issue of Woodcraft magazine and there was an interview by Gary Rogowski. They published a Q&A profile and I really appreciated this quote “When you realize that errors ultimately guide you toward better work, you learn to handle failure in a positive manner.” Often I struggle with that! I will admit to looking at the very intricate and detailed projects on LJ and reflecting that I wouldn’t even know where to start. With a mindset of learning from my errors… well I have a lot of errors… who knows what I can accomplish! Definitely learn from each project – both the aspects that worked out as well as those that needed a little “correction.” That quote may just need to get posted in my shop to help me from getting too down on myself when the inevitable errors occur. And I’ll keep looking at all the great posted projects here on LJ for inspiration!



17 comments so far

View Ron Aylor's profile (online now)

Ron Aylor

2493 posts in 609 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 11:05 AM

Very profound. If not for errors, I’d never finish a project. I do believe it was the errors that dictated the design elements of the four Prie Dieux I built over the last three years.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 11:52 AM

Yours are examples of the projects I cannot imagine attempting! Knowing that established woodworkers also face errors, which become part of the design, is encouraging. I appreciate how you share the process in your blogs.


Very profound. If not for errors, I d never finish a project. I do believe it was the errors that dictated the design elements of the four Prie Dieux I built over the last three years.

- Ron Aylor


View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

20268 posts in 3067 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 03:36 PM

I think the sign of a good woodworker it how they recover from an error. We all make them and you can’t let them set you back. Find a way to correct it and travel on to the end of the project. The errors all teach us something and it is best if we can learn from someone else’s errors but if they are yours and you share what happened, you can help the next guy/girl!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

54 posts in 798 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 05:04 PM

One thing I have concluded after years of wood working is that I am probably just a bit better at it than when I started, but I an a whole lot better at hiding/fixing my screw ups. :-)

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

4283 posts in 2228 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 05:07 PM



One thing I have concluded after years of wood working is that I am probably just a bit better at it than when I started, but I an a whole lot better at hiding/fixing my screw ups. :-)

- Davevand


YUP!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Jbay's profile

Jbay

2221 posts in 861 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 05:43 PM

I must know more than anybody then… :>/

I used to have guys working for me, sometimes I would see them doing something wrong, instead of flat out telling them it was wrong I would wait until they made the mistake because I knew they would learn better than just me saying it.

The mistake cost me, but I saw it as investment to better my employee.

View Ron Aylor's profile (online now)

Ron Aylor

2493 posts in 609 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 09:23 PM



Yours are examples of the projects I cannot imagine attempting! Knowing that established woodworkers also face errors, which become part of the design, is encouraging. I appreciate how you share the process in your blogs.

- BB1


Thank you, but don’t sell yourself short! Nothing should be beyond attempting … beside that’s how we master errors … right? I’m glad you enjoy my blogs.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#8 posted 03-21-2018 01:11 AM

Definitely. I appreciate the project descriptions that give background on the process…including corrections from original plans.


I think the sign of a good woodworker it how they recover from an error. We all make them and you can t let them set you back. Find a way to correct it and travel on to the end of the project. The errors all teach us something and it is best if we can learn from someone else s errors but if they are yours and you share what happened, you can help the next guy/girl!!

Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#9 posted 03-21-2018 01:13 AM

I’ll add a yup. My husband calls the hide/fix process my craftsmanship…or a “design feature” :)

One thing I have concluded after years of wood working is that I am probably just a bit better at it than when I started, but I an a whole lot better at hiding/fixing my screw ups. :-)

- Davevand

YUP!

- ralbuck


View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#10 posted 03-21-2018 01:22 AM

Making a mistake does help alert the mind to avoiding the same situation in the future…at least most of the time. Sometime I get more than one learning opportunity!!


I must know more than anybody then… :>/

I used to have guys working for me, sometimes I would see them doing something wrong, instead of flat out telling them it was wrong I would wait until they made the mistake because I knew they would learn better than just me saying it.

The mistake cost me, but I saw it as investment to better my employee.

- jbay

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

4318 posts in 2371 days


#11 posted 03-22-2018 03:18 AM

I should have a Doctorate in making mistakes and having to fix them.

ROFL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View tacky68's profile

tacky68

66 posts in 1389 days


#12 posted 03-22-2018 04:02 AM

BB: I am extremely ADD, with a poor understanding of math, and a propensity of losing things if they are not nailed down. I am also a perfectionist that thinks I should be within a 1/1000 the first time, every time. It makes me feel
a lot better reading/knowing that I am not the only that makes mistakes. THANK YOU, everyone who responded to
this thread.
P.S. do not be afraid to try something new. As long as it is not dangerous/no one gets hurt, you have nothing to lose
except a little wood.

Tim

View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#13 posted 03-22-2018 10:32 AM

Part of the process!! :)


I should have a Doctorate in making mistakes and having to fix them.

ROFL

- woodbutcherbynight


View BB1's profile

BB1

1116 posts in 810 days


#14 posted 03-22-2018 10:40 AM

I totally understand this. I watch various videos and see “perfection” and then get frustrated when my process isn’t so smooth. I do sometime wonder how many pieces end up discarded before the picture/video sequence that is puplished. I appreciate the instructional dvds that I have that show some minor “redo” segments to dial in a cut. A little reality which is very helpful when learning!


BB: I am extremely ADD, with a poor understanding of math, and a propensity of losing things if they are not nailed down. I am also a perfectionist that thinks I should be within a 1/1000 the first time, every time. It makes me feel
a lot better reading/knowing that I am not the only that makes mistakes. THANK YOU, everyone who responded to
this thread. Tim
P.S. do not be afraid to try something new. As long as it is not dangerous/no one gets hurt, you have nothing to lose
except a little wood.

- tacky68


View Ron Aylor's profile (online now)

Ron Aylor

2493 posts in 609 days


#15 posted 03-22-2018 11:55 AM

I have found that my blogs are helping curve a lot of my errors. As I go through a build, taking photos, I catch all sorts of imperfections that have escaped the naked eye …
 

 
... I just knew that was square!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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