LumberJocks

Another change in plans

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Blog entry by BB1 posted 12-16-2017 04:52 PM 643 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A couple weeks ago, I had a “bump in the road” with the fracture of my 5th metatarsal (bone on the outside aspect of the foot) and then this week I unfortunately developed a DVT (deep vein thrombosis) in the calf of that leg. I have been placed on a blood thinner and been instructed that wood working activity is not a good idea. Guess having slower clotting ability coupled with fast moving sharp metal blades and bits is a concern. :(

I meet with a doctor next week to determine the specifics of my treatment plan. Apparently, typical treatment with blood thinner medication is 3-6 months and I’m praying that the shorter time frame will be recommended so I can get back in the shop. Since woodworking was my planned “outlet” while sidelined by my broken foot, I’m trying to find some positive ways to handle this whole situation. Maybe doing some project planning – although given my typical method of working my way through projects off of rough sketches has not prepared me for this approach!! I had purchased some wood working videos in the holiday sale flurry so will have those to watch. I have some boxes that I still need to apply finish and add the hinges – assuming a drill is not on my “banned” list of tools – so at least have a few carry over projects that I can work on here in the house (note that my living room has been my finishing area for a while, so that’s nothing new!!). Until I’m back to the shop, I look forward to seeing and reading about all the project posted here in LJ. This has been, and continues to be, such a great resource for information, inspiration, and encouragement. Merry Christmas to everyone!



8 comments so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 766 days


#1 posted 12-16-2017 05:06 PM

Here’s to a speedy recovery. I know being sidelined can be frustrating. Have fun watching videos and project planning for next year. Have a Merry Christmas and be careful.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2011 posts in 1924 days


#2 posted 12-16-2017 05:28 PM

Blood thinners not the problem, have been on and off for the last 30 years! On again at the moment but still work in the shop and still use my straight edge razor to shave. Solution is not to cut yourself! Or at least not too badly?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1168 posts in 966 days


#3 posted 12-16-2017 10:19 PM

Hoping for a speedy recovery for sure! I’m looking forward to meeting with the doctor this coming week to discuss what I can do at this point and what activities I need to defer for a time. I just finished putting another coat of finish on some gift boxes. Glad to have that to do – funny as typically applying the coats of finish is my least favorite part!

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

21110 posts in 3224 days


#4 posted 12-16-2017 10:38 PM

I’m sure you are save with the saws with blades and router bits so the biggest bleeding risk may be slivers or cuts from edges of things you are handling, so maybe you can proceed with gloves on for that time frame!

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View BB1's profile

BB1

1168 posts in 966 days


#5 posted 12-16-2017 10:49 PM

I do my best to maintain safe practices. Only once did I have a minor cut at the table saw and that small cut was enough to encourage ongoing vigilance. Most of my “bleeding incidents” have been related to handling of wood or plywood. For my husband’s peace of mind, I have promised to stay out of the shop for now. I’ll hopefully get better clarification from the doctor on all the factors to consider with the blood thinner regimen.


I m sure you are save with the saws with blades and router bits so the biggest bleeding risk may be slivers or cuts from edges of things you are handling, so maybe you can proceed with gloves on for that time frame!

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


View BB1's profile

BB1

1168 posts in 966 days


#6 posted 12-29-2017 04:07 PM

Update: doctor said shop time is ok…but to be careful and realize if I do cut myself, clotting will just take longer. So, back to some simple projects after one more “bump in the road” last week when I came down with the flu (highly suggest avoiding as it was a tough one!). During my off time, LJ has been a good outlet – lot of great projects posted!

View Joe's profile

Joe

482 posts in 1205 days


#7 posted 02-18-2018 02:16 AM

I hope you are recovering and glad you are back in your shop. My wife and son are both on Coumadin, so I have some idea of your situation. One suggestion I would recommend is to have someone in the shop with you, maybe not all time, but at a time when you feel the extra need for support in case something goes wrong. You can survive a small cut, a large one you will need help fast. That is really a good suggestion for anyone really, accidents do happen. A shop is inheranty a dangerous place. We should all pay closer attention to the details of safety, I know I should. Another thing I have noticed is that experience, and shear size and muscle can make a safe act for one and an unsafe act for novice or smaller person. One guide doesn’t fit all. Think safety, and rest yourself so you can be at your best and safest in the shop. P.S. Thanks for “your “kind words on my project. Take Care, Joe

-- CurleyJoe, "You only learn from your mistakes"

View BB1's profile

BB1

1168 posts in 966 days


#8 posted 02-18-2018 02:25 AM

Yes, have tried to keep safety as an extra priority. I appreciate your suggestions and encouragement. If all goes smoothly, I should be off the Coumadin in about a month.

Hope to see you post more projects—that box is real nice.


I hope you are recovering and glad you are back in your shop. My wife and son are both on Coumadin, so I have some idea of your situation. One suggestion I would recommend is to have someone in the shop with you, maybe not all time, but at a time when you feel the extra need for support in case something goes wrong. You can survive a small cut, a large one you will need help fast. That is really a good suggestion for anyone really, accidents do happen. A shop is inheranty a dangerous place. We should all pay closer attention to the details of safety, I know I should. Another thing I have noticed is that experience, and shear size and muscle can make a safe act for one and an unsafe act for novice or smaller person. One guide doesn t fit all. Think safety, and rest yourself so you can be at your best and safest in the shop. P.S. Thanks for “your “kind words on my project. Take Care, Joe

- Joe


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