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"Art Box" Tutorial #10: Pin Hinges

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Blog entry by Andy posted 1832 days ago 15705 reads 36 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: It all hinges on this. Part 10 of "Art Box" Tutorial series Part 11: Butt or Barrel Hinges »

Updated 1/16/12

I spent a lot of time developing a way to let the lid swing down into the box, yet still maintaining a fairly tight reveal on all four sides
The difficulty is the lip itself. It doesnt allow the back of the lid to drop into the box, so thats where we need to cut it away a little deeper at the back. I call these pockets.
The other difficulty is in getting the hinge placement spot on or it wont open at all or not far enough to stay open.

Here is how its done:
Use the same pattern bit and bearing setup that you just finished using for the lip of the box. What we are going to do is crank the bearing up in several stages to cut deep pockets just at the back for the lid to drop down into.

It will look like this.

The finished depth.

The finished width.

Set a fence 1 1/18’’ to 1 3/4’’ from the center of the bit.
You will need to experiment with this depending on your bit and bearing setup.

Pin Location:

As the lid drops into the box it scibes a larger arc than it would if we were using barrel hinges or butt hinges.
If we located the pins at the far back corner, then the lid would contact the back lip before it fully opened.
After much experimenting, I came up with a placement that allows the lid to swing down into the box and then lean back enough that it will stay open on its own. Also this location will position the pin in the center of the lid, after we grind away the top portion of the lid.

Remember we have a lid that is 3/4’’ thick,and our recess is 1/2’’ deep,which leaves 1/4’’ of the lid standing out of the box.S o, if we shape the top of the lid down to the lip of the box we will end up with a lid that is only 1/2’’ thick at its edges, which places the pin in the center of the edge.

Drill the hole the diameter of your brass pins. I use 1/8” brazing rod found at most hardware or welding supply stores.

Drill about 1 1/2” deep total. I am using a simple jig with steel bushings, one leg is for the left and the jig swings around to do the right. Tou can eyeball it with a hand drill or use a drill press. If the pins are not in alignment the lid will swing up crookedly and bind up.

The lid will be off and on several times while you remove the wood on both the lid and box at the back. I use long roofing nails to act as temporary hinges, they are easier to get out. Polish them up so the slip in smoothly.

Before we can open the lid we need to pare away some wood on the top and bottom, at the very back edge.

Tip:
Wiggle the lid up and down when you have the pins in,even if its a little bit,remove the pins and look for rub marks where its tight and sand those away. Keep doing this.

Warning: I want to caution you about going too fast because it is very easy to remove too much wood at the back, leaving a thin line that will disappear if you grind into it. Final sanding will remove additional wood, aggravating the problem even more. If you arent sure how much wood you have left along the back edge, then just stay away from there when shaping.

This photo
shows a side view of the lid after beveling the top/back edge and bottom/back edge and corners. Final fine sanding will be done later.
Here you can see the line where we stopped the top bevel, and if you look to the far right, in the middle, you can see a flat spot about 1/4’’ high.That is the only area that is still in contact with the back of the box. Carefully hand sand along this line until the lid opens without rubbing. Do this at a downward taper.
Keep in mind that your finish will add little material to each surface and you may get areas where it will rub.This is one of those things that depends on many factors including humidity. Just be sure it works pretty good for now and you can fine fit it later just before finishing.

And here we have a working lid.

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com



17 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2179 days


#1 posted 1832 days ago

Super blog interesting work thanks for sharing

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 2558 days


#2 posted 1832 days ago

i guess it is only wood

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View BarryW's profile

BarryW

1015 posts in 2508 days


#3 posted 1832 days ago

giving the design character and personality…nice work.

-- /\/\/\ BarryW /\/\/\ Stay so busy you don't have time to die.

View Jonathan55's profile

Jonathan55

14 posts in 1941 days


#4 posted 1823 days ago

I have wood for several boxes cut. I was thinking my first would have a lift off top like your designer boxes then move on to more complicated. I get the idea that the lid fits snugly to begin with but does it really stay in place when you take the angle grinder to it? I was thinking it might need something like double sided tape.

Also I had some 1/8 walnut for the splines and I used a single dado blade (with a flat grind) from my stack to cut the slots and it came out a little slopy by about 64th or so. I have my fingers crossed. Back to the drawing board.
Jonathan

View cwdance1's profile

cwdance1

1143 posts in 1861 days


#5 posted 1823 days ago

Please don’t stop this blog as I have it all printed out so I can make a box when the instructions are complete.

View Andy's profile (online now)

Andy

1535 posts in 2510 days


#6 posted 1822 days ago

Thanks for reading everyone.I am working on the next installment and will post soon I hope.I have a lot going on this summer :-)

@Jonathan-You are right…tape is a great way to hold the lid in place while shaping.

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View Andy's profile (online now)

Andy

1535 posts in 2510 days


#7 posted 1822 days ago

And onto the next

http://lumberjocks.com/Argyllshire/blog/10308

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View kolwdwrkr's profile

kolwdwrkr

2821 posts in 2192 days


#8 posted 1821 days ago

It would be great if you had put this as a series to make it easier to follow. Nice box. Have to go see the other blogs on it

-- ~ Inspiring those who inspire me ~

View Andy's profile (online now)

Andy

1535 posts in 2510 days


#9 posted 1820 days ago

I agree,but I dont know how to do that.I tried to set this up that way but it didnt work.
Douglas Bordner is going to convert this to a PDF when its complete.Thanks for looking.

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View Dalehurst's profile

Dalehurst

27 posts in 1765 days


#10 posted 1423 days ago

Hi Andy!

Question. “The grinder. Just a 4’’ angle grinder,guard removed,and a 5’’ flexible sanding disc” – Do you need to have some type of backer for the sanding? When I used my 4” grinder with a 5” flexible sanding disc the disc
pretty much torn apart not long after I stared grinding. Is this normal? The wood is maple. I am using a makita grinder.

Thank You

Bruce

View Andy's profile (online now)

Andy

1535 posts in 2510 days


#11 posted 1422 days ago

Hi Bruce, actually my grinder came with a flexible rubber disc for sanding, the sanding discs set on that.
I took some advice from a fellow Jock and started using the flap sanding discs made for the 4’’ grinder and they work great. They are good for scooping out the bowl of a spoon too.
Hope this helps,

Andy

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7622 posts in 2654 days


#12 posted 1422 days ago

Andy, could you give us some Links to the Flapper sanding thingy you’re talking about… maybe some pics too?

Sanding is the real Key to this type of sculptured work…

Thank you…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Andy's profile (online now)

Andy

1535 posts in 2510 days


#13 posted 1421 days ago

Good idea Joe, here is a link to illustrate what I am talking about. You will need to confirm your arbor size. I buy mine at the local hardware store, or home center.
Happy grinding

http://www.shop3m.com/3m-flap-disc-f3mwjbcp0h.html

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View Dalehurst's profile

Dalehurst

27 posts in 1765 days


#14 posted 1421 days ago

Perfect

Thank You Andy

Bruce

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7622 posts in 2654 days


#15 posted 1302 days ago

Very good!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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