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Saturday in the Woodworking Shop #10: Lumber Case Hardening

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Blog entry by AndyPitts posted 07-30-2015 12:01 PM 4362 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Solar Kilns Part 10 of Saturday in the Woodworking Shop series Part 11: Measuring Moisture in Lumber »

We hear about “case hardening” regarding lumber drying. What is case hardening, anyway? Is it a problem? Does it always happen when drying lumber? This video will try to explain what case hardening is, how it happens, and why it can be a problem. Hope this helps. Andy


View on YouTube

-- Andy Pitts, Heathsville, Virginia, http://www.AndrewPittsFurnitureMaker.com, YouTube AndyPitts1000



3 comments so far

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2863 days


#1 posted 07-30-2015 05:56 PM

Andy, I posted on your YouTube page, but I’ll repeat the question here.

Is there something that can be done to a case hardened board to relieve the stresses short of planing both sides?
Like a mist of water or vapor, for example?

I’m doing this for those who don’t use YouTube.

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2272 days


#2 posted 08-02-2015 05:43 PM

Very informal series Andy. Thnx for sharing your knowledge.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View AndyPitts's profile

AndyPitts

122 posts in 545 days


#3 posted 08-03-2015 12:51 PM



Andy, I posted on your YouTube page, but I ll repeat the question here.

Is there something that can be done to a case hardened board to relieve the stresses short of planing both sides?
Like a mist of water or vapor, for example?

I m doing this for those who don t use YouTube.

- Don “Dances with Wood” Butler

Don, not that I am aware of. The equalizing process in commercial kilns helps, but once the plank is dry I think there is no going back. I plane both sides of the plank, and that seems to work if you have the excess thickness available.

-- Andy Pitts, Heathsville, Virginia, http://www.AndrewPittsFurnitureMaker.com, YouTube AndyPitts1000

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