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Blog entry by Ryan posted 08-21-2011 03:37 AM 831 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So I believe strongly that a large part of carpentry in the modern world is using updated tools. That’s why I posted this image of some of my most important tools. I understand if you disagree with this sentiment, and I respect that, but I wanna know what everyone else thinks.

By way of explanation, the first and foremost is DraftSight (2d Rendering Module), second is Microsoft Word 2010, third is Mozilla Firefox (Internet browser).
Photobucket

Agree or disagree, is designing and modeling your projects on a computer “cheating” or is it perfectly acceptable with the changing times?

-- "Arguments with furniture are rarely productive." Kehlog Albran



6 comments so far

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1642 days


#1 posted 08-21-2011 03:57 AM

Use the tools that work for you – somewhere, somebody will think you are taking the long way, the shortcut way , the bad way, the right way. Who cares what they think? :)

I design in both autoCAD and with a crayon. It’s about equal between them.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2648 days


#2 posted 08-21-2011 04:41 AM

Lis, I love your attitude.

I use SketchUp and a 4ft x 4ft Dry-marker board I keep in the shop. Essentially slightly updated crayon’s!

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View Woodbutchery's profile

Woodbutchery

276 posts in 2242 days


#3 posted 08-21-2011 05:36 AM

I agree with Lis; no matter what you do, how you go about, you’ll always be able to find somebody willing to point out just how wrong you are ;-).

It’s a hobby, and just in choice of mallets there appear to be a thousand plus different ways to skin that cat.

I like sketchup to visualize and get my build in order, then a printout and it’s off to the workshop.

-- Making scrap with zen-like precision - Woodbutchery

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5109 posts in 1965 days


#4 posted 08-21-2011 05:25 PM

I tried learning sketchup on several occasions and I just cannot figure out how to use it. I have been using pencil and paper for over 40 years and that works for me. I have a woodworker friend who tried showing me how to use sketchup and I guess i just was not that interested in it. If it doesn’t need fixin’ don’t broke it.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

View BobTheFish's profile

BobTheFish

361 posts in 1208 days


#5 posted 08-22-2011 06:19 AM

I use two notebooks (an actual notepad and a sketchbook, but for some reason the sketchpad is my “good” notebook for writing in design related notes and doing design drawings, and the notebook is my messy crap, filled with numbers, material combinations, really horrible sketches, grocery lists, etc.)

Other than that, I use a rollerball pen (no pencil really) and a set of graphite and sepia pencils for color.

I want to eventually post some pics of my notebooks.

I laugh because I am probably one of the youngest out of all you guys, and the computer is just too damned confusing for me. :)

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2648 days


#6 posted 08-22-2011 07:58 PM

I think I resorted to Sketchup mostly because I work with computers daily and I have almost no artistic talent when it comes to pencil & ink. I really like Sketchup for proofing or visualizing designs. But, sometimes i’m already in the shop and want to get the idea that pops into my head down on paper so to speak. That’s where the dry marker board come in.

It really does come down to whatever works for you. I was recently going through some of my dad’s old things and found his hand drawn plans for the cabinets and several pieces of furniture in my parents house. Man he puts me to shame when it comes to details. But, again it’s what worked for him.

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

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