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Plane restoration #13: I finally got it... still looking for a couple more

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Blog entry by Alonso posted 02-09-2010 08:45 AM 5740 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Stanley No 118 & No 130 great block planes!!!! Part 13 of Plane restoration series Part 14: So many planes.... time for an storage solution... »

Hey Folks,

I’ve been pretty busy working on the shop lately, between plane restoration and a few past due projects that I had, I didn’t have time to make a new blog entry until now.

Last week I got a lot with 10 bench planes out eBay, for a pretty good price. Out of those 10 planes there were 2 No’s 7 and 1 No 8. I couldn’t believe it, mi first No 8, and it was on a very sad condition. It is a No 8 Type 9 1902-1907, yes this baby is somewhere between 103 and 108 years old, I still can’t understand how some individuals may let this kind of tools get into such bad condition.

At the moment of the picture I had already worked on the knob and Tote, originally the knob was totally broken into 2 separate pieces, as well the Tote.

Do you see what I see? It seems like one of the previous owners replace the frog with an newer model with a frog adjusting screw but the body has no hole for this, now I need to look for the correct frog, anyone out there willing to sell me one?

After working with the Evaporust, doing some wire brushing, some lapping, I stripped the remaining old Japanning, applied 3 coats of black enamel paint and baked them at 320 for 20 to 25 minutes, My dad fixed the Tote with a new method that I haven’t seen before, and all I can say is that its holding like a brand new Tote, I applied 3 coats of polyurethane and sanded them off with a 320 grit between coats follow with 2 coats of paste wax and buffed with a 0000 Steel wool. I sharpened the blade using the scary method, and set up a microbevel at 30 degrees.

The final product

The giant is back on business

Thanks for looking.

Alonso

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.



13 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112104 posts in 2235 days


#1 posted 02-09-2010 08:49 AM

Wow that looks wonderful Alonso

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 1892 days


#2 posted 02-09-2010 03:44 PM

I’m jealous, my #8 is still in beat up shape, haven’t had a chance to work on it at all. I’m also still trying to find a replacement for the lever cap, since the one that came with the plane is broken quite severely. Looks great though :)

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2419 days


#3 posted 02-09-2010 03:52 PM

Your #8 is a Stanley/Bailey type II, which is one of Chris Schwarz’s favorite planes. Chris, who is the editor of “Popular Woodworking”, devotes a special write up on the type II in his new book “Handplane Essentials”. If you don’t yet have this book – get it.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Alonso's profile

Alonso

946 posts in 1896 days


#4 posted 02-09-2010 04:15 PM

8iowa,

I found this interesting, what characteristics did you see that I didn’t see so that you determined this is a type 2 and not a type 9?

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2419 days


#5 posted 02-09-2010 05:10 PM

I’m far from an expert, but Schwarz’s description of the type II stated that it was the only S/B plane to show three patent dates. Also the “mushroom” type front knob is unique to the type II. I would love to have a #8 in type II. This was a great find, a real stroke of fortune.

As I see it, the frequency of hand plane postings is an indication that hand plane use is making a strong comeback. It’s obvious to me that the guys here who are putting forth the restoration efforts, intend to use these tools, and not just place them on display.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13341 posts in 2331 days


#6 posted 02-09-2010 05:24 PM

Nice job!

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Alonso's profile

Alonso

946 posts in 1896 days


#7 posted 02-09-2010 05:46 PM

8iowa,

This is what I see on the plane,

2 patent dates behind the frog.
No frog adjusting screw hole on the body / even though the frog has that little plate at the bottom of the frog to adjust the frog/ this is why I think one of the previous owners change the frog, perhaps the original got damage?
“B” Stamped on the body, under the Tote.

According to this website a type 2 should have a solid brass depth adjusting knob and the Bailey’s patent stamped on the brass knob, and mine does not have any of those two, again type 9 seems to be a better match according to the webstie. Regardless yes, it is a great plane and I’m very happy with it.

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2419 days


#8 posted 02-09-2010 08:15 PM

I thought I saw three patend dates in your picture. It’s still a great hand plane.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2101 posts in 2386 days


#9 posted 02-09-2010 09:55 PM

i think the top line says “pat date”. i think the next two line actually show a date.

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 1892 days


#10 posted 02-10-2010 02:59 PM

My #8 has three patent dates on it, but one of them is ‘10, so it was made after 1910 (but before 1918, due to some other differences). I’m pretty sure that makes mine a type 10 or 11, so just slightly newer than Alonso’s. It still has the low knob and smaller diameter brass depth adjuster.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

254 posts in 1434 days


#11 posted 10-26-2010 06:28 AM

Man, that thing was rough! Nice job breathing the life back into her. Also, would you care to describe the method your Dad used on the tote?

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2303 posts in 1438 days


#12 posted 10-26-2010 01:18 PM

Very nice work, you wouldn’t recognize the before and afters ! I had a similar experience with a number 7, it’d been painted red, then gold over top, chunk broken out of the side, and at sometime a long stove bolt had been run through the tote..and right out through the sole, the nut wasn’t even ground flush. Had a friend do a minor weld under the tote to take the proper bolt and reworked everything else. I couldn’t do anything about the broken side, the chunk was long gone, but the finished product was pleasing to me and very useable. As for the hole in the sole..and it also had the hanging hole at the rear, it’s amazing how well a two part grey metal epoxy putty works and blends in !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View Michael J. Moore's profile

Michael J. Moore

52 posts in 1527 days


#13 posted 09-10-2011 03:59 AM

Man I like that. I just picked up a Stanley/Bailey No. 5-1/2 Corrugated Type 11 Jack Plane at the recommendation of Chris Schwarz and I’m just waiting for it to get here. I’ll post some pictures of it on my blog if you’d like to have a look. I plan on giving it a one over as well so it does not reach the point your plane was in when you bought it.

Cheers!

-- Michael Jos Moore | Farmington, UT

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