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Fitting the aprons to the Cabriole legs

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Blog entry by AlaskaGuy posted 02-21-2012 01:11 AM 1639 reads 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In this blog I’ll be using pictures I took while building my wife’s “Makeup Dresser”. If you haven’t seen the ’’Makeup Dresser”and would like to you can view it at the link below.


 


http://www.theamericanwoodworker.com/photo/copy-of-makeup1?context=album&albumId=5228218%3AAlbum%3A8358


 


After the Cabriole leg are finished I glue up the panels for the two ends and the back of the dresser. I cut them to size and allow for the length of the l tenons in the sizing cuts because I’m using integral tenons. You may also use loose tenons if that fits your work methods. BTW if you noticed the book in the lower right hand corner I recommend this book highly. The book is mostly just picture and not much in the way of instructions but shows how furniture goes together. The name of the book is “Illustrated Cabinetmaking” written by “Bill Hylton”.



Once I have the panels made and sized it’s time to make the tenons. I start that process on my shaper. I mount two rebate cutters with the appropriate sized spacer between the rebate heads and cut one long tenon on the ends of all the panels.


Here I’m picking out the correct number of spacers. 



The panels come off he shaper with on long tenon. Making the tenons can be done in many ways. You could use a dado blade, a router and even hand planes if that’s what you’re into that.


 


Now I’m going to lay out the individual tenons that will fit the legs. I just line up the long tenon with the legs and mark the beginning and end of each tenon.


Once the tenons are laid out it time to cut them. yes, I occasionally use a hand tool.


Now I’m going to my router table to cut out the waste. These can also be chiseled out if you like.


and I end up with this. Any yes I clean up the corners with a chisel after the router work.


Now I round the edges of the tenons with a file a do a test fit. Once I know the tenons and leg fit correctly I lay out the profiles on the bottoms of the panels and cut them.  I don’t have a picture of laying out and cutting the profiles on the bottoms of the side pieces so you’ll just have to imagine that.


Now I’m ready to start making the face frame for the front of the piece. From here on I didn’t take as many photos as I should have. At the time I had no Idea I’d ever be trying to write a blog about it’s construction.


First I’m going to make the top stretcher of the front frame. It gets dovetailed into the top of the front two legs. I used my router table to cut the dovetails on both the stretcher and the top of the legs. Since the router leaves a rounded area in the bottom of the leg dovetail socket some chisel work is need to flatten the bottom. 


 


Using both dovetails and domino loose tenons I set out to finish the face frameI finally end up with a face frame.


 



 

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!



8 comments so far

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 1990 days


#1 posted 02-21-2012 01:20 AM

Looking good. Is it just me, or is it essentially a low boy without the large drawer across the top?

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

839 posts in 1064 days


#2 posted 02-21-2012 01:30 AM

It’s very much a low bow but has 3 drawers across the top and knee/leg room.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 1990 days


#3 posted 02-21-2012 01:35 AM

Yeah after posting that I hit google images and found there’s much more range in low boys than I knew. Popular Woodworking had one in their magazine a year or so ago, just had a triffid foot instead of a pad or ball & claw. I’d love to build one some day.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1564 days


#4 posted 02-21-2012 03:41 AM

That is a beautiful piece.Very well exacuted my friend !

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112943 posts in 2332 days


#5 posted 02-21-2012 03:56 AM

Wow you have some great equipment and a well documented build ,that takes a lot of extra effort.
I can’t see real well how you approached your side pieces and how your handling wood movement in the cross grain between the legs and side panels?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

839 posts in 1064 days


#6 posted 02-21-2012 05:38 AM

a1Jim,

Good question on the cross grain movement. I didn’t. And I know better. The plan was to do it just like I do a bread board end. I was supposed to glue the center tenon and pin the upper and lower tenons that have elongated holes. I went to the shop one day space that detail out and glued the thing up.

I built that 3 years ago and so far nothing has split or shows any sign of damage. Go figure. My shop and my house have about the same humidity levels and our seasonal change isn’t large. Hopefully it will continue to stay in one piece.

I guess I’ll never be able to move to Arizona.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112943 posts in 2332 days


#7 posted 02-21-2012 05:57 AM

Hey Rich
We all space stuff sometimes, hopefully it will hold.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Roger's profile

Roger

15371 posts in 1559 days


#8 posted 02-21-2012 12:23 PM

very beautiful build. gr8 question a1J.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

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