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Building a 25' Ply on Frame Cabin Cruiser #13: Update ... snail speed!

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Blog entry by AlTriolo posted 06-11-2017 08:28 PM 1613 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Beginning the c/l installation Part 13 of Building a 25' Ply on Frame Cabin Cruiser series Part 14: Back to work! »

A busy schedule has made progress very slow these past two weeks. I used the one nice day that coincided with a free day for this:

Since my last post, the work I have done is tedious and doesn’t show much progress. For one thing, I realized that my stem and three forward frames were not lining up properly because of the twist in the keelson. I had added 1×2 strips to keep everything together. Those needed to come out. I then used a series of tie downs and used tension to pull the frames into alignment. Once all squared up, I added two sets of 1×2. Today I started the s/c.

Here’s me using a few scraps as a tool to measure the height of the 1×4 in the groove. The outside edge should be flush with frame. Three pieces of the same thickness does the trick.

During those many days of doing nothing, I had to feel like I did something. So I cut a c/l.



5 comments so far

View English's profile

English

575 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 06-11-2017 10:08 PM

Hey it’s starting to look like a boat. Slow is good. Getting this right is very important..

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View AlTriolo's profile

AlTriolo

27 posts in 348 days


#2 posted 06-12-2017 01:53 AM

Hi John,
How important is it really to get everything even? I’ve been captain compulsive getting these frames evenly spaced and even front to back and port to starboard. Then I and support it all with multiple 1×2. And still I noticed that frames somehow became uneven. Argh!
Thanks,
Al

View English's profile

English

575 posts in 1258 days


#3 posted 06-12-2017 04:46 PM

Keeping the frames straight will allow the lines to be the same on both sides. If they are off by much it will affect the line the boat will steer. I moved mine after the plywood way installed. They can easily be moved aft after the plywood is installed by using pipe camps set up to push. They don’t have to be perfect to the plans, just the same on both sides. Then they can be locked down with screws and epoxy filieted to insure the bond. Any that are out just a little 1/2” or less. Just push it in place pushing off a fixed frame, one that is screwed and glued. Then screw down the pushed frame and filet it latter to bond plywood to frame.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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AlTriolo

27 posts in 348 days


#4 posted 06-12-2017 05:32 PM

I know I am being totally compulsive but I was so disappointed to find it out of alignment after a lot of work to get it right. I’m not in any hurry (I’m actually on the water on The Trowlson as I write this). So, I think I will cut new spacers from 1×2s which I will screw in frame by frame. That will keep the spacing correct and allow me to twist each frame into alignment. This truly is the longest part of the main hull. (Once it’s flipped over it’s going to take wars.) But I want to get this right.

View English's profile

English

575 posts in 1258 days


#5 posted 06-12-2017 08:54 PM

Al. My wife and I took mine out Friday, Got into some 3 ft seas down near the Navy base out in the middle of the Harbor. I was able to make 12 mph in the waves and chop. We decided to abandon the idea of going to Harbor fest and took a trip down one of the rivers. When we returned to the harbor from our river trip the seas had calmed and the water was smooth. Total trip 62.3 miles on 15 gallons of gas. We took a picnic lunch and had a ball. We were out about 6 hours.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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