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HELP WANTED! For clear finishes

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Blog entry by AAWW2005 posted 04-03-2012 09:49 PM 3638 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

HI all, I’m looking for some advise…

I’ve used many different clear coat finishes and can’t seam to get the finish I’m looking for. I’m constantly having to sand dust out of my clear coats. Any suggestions? I’m looking for that furniture finsh. Thanks in advance!

-- "Your Design or Mine!"



13 comments so far

View bhog's profile

bhog

2150 posts in 1378 days


#1 posted 04-03-2012 11:02 PM

Have you tried blonde shellac? I REALLY like shellac for finishing, dries fast enough that you pretty much have to dump dust on it to have nibs.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

View Fuzzy's profile

Fuzzy

293 posts in 2677 days


#2 posted 04-03-2012 11:24 PM

Short of some pretty expensive spray equipment and an ultra clean dedicated spray booth, it’s hard to get that perfect finish. Not impossible … just difficult. Shoot many coats of finish, sanding LIGHTLY between every 2nd or 3rd coat. Let the final coat stand for as long as possible … a week if possible, then start wet sanding & rubbing out with finer & finer abrasives until the finish is dead flat & smooth. Finally polish with Pumice & Rottenstone or equivalent and wax. The dust nibs will be minimal and probably undetectable in the final finish.

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112322 posts in 2265 days


#3 posted 04-03-2012 11:48 PM

I don’t have a spray booth so when I put a top coat of finish on usually water base , I get my shop up to temperature and then turn of the heat so the blower doesn’t come on and I make sure I have no saw dust on me and then clean my work table off and wipe it down with a sponge and then I put a large piece of cardboard down after I have wiped it down on both sides with a damp sponge and then as I put what I’m going to spray on the card board I wipe both sides of the item to be finished with a tack cloth after that I wipe down my air hose with a damp sponge and then begin to spray. The trick is to eliminate all the dust you can in the area where your going to finish. It helps to use a finish that dry’s fairly quick like lacquer, or Shellac or a water base that drys to the touch with in a half hour. If you don’t have spray equipment lacquer and shellac comes in rattle cans and they work fine for small to medium projects. This approach has always worked for me.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View AAWW2005's profile

AAWW2005

100 posts in 1639 days


#4 posted 04-03-2012 11:52 PM

What about Wipe on Poly or a Brush on Poly?

-- "Your Design or Mine!"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112322 posts in 2265 days


#5 posted 04-03-2012 11:57 PM

You can use a wipe on poly or brush on poly but usually they have more open time to dry . If you want to go to the trouble you could do a test piece and see if you still have a dust problem after detailed clean up.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1474 posts in 1049 days


#6 posted 04-04-2012 12:01 AM

After a short shallow learning curve, solvent lacquer becomes the no-brainer finish that brings success every time. Invest in a decent compressor and conventional gun, get a gallon of Sherwin-Williams T70F6x or T75F1x, a gallon of reducer, and have at it.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1199 posts in 1312 days


#7 posted 04-04-2012 01:42 AM

I am a lacquer guy so I suggest shellac…..no really I love lacquer I spray it from a cheap as dirt spray gun cut 75/25 with great results. Lots of thin coats light sand at 3, 6 and nine. I can usually with nice weather get them all on in two days. Rub out the last coat after a day of rest, and wax.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View AAWW2005's profile

AAWW2005

100 posts in 1639 days


#8 posted 04-04-2012 04:44 AM

What kind of wax? And what suggestion on brand and product for the spray lacquers? I’ve tried just about all the stuff Home Depot and Lowes carries and am not sure if I like them. I know patience is a virtue, but some times you want to eat your cake too…

-- "Your Design or Mine!"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112322 posts in 2265 days


#9 posted 04-04-2012 04:56 AM

When you want fine wine you don’t go to 7 eleven :))

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/renaissancewax.aspx

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View AAWW2005's profile

AAWW2005

100 posts in 1639 days


#10 posted 04-04-2012 05:01 AM

I went to that site, thanks Jim, sounds like awsome stuff!

-- "Your Design or Mine!"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112322 posts in 2265 days


#11 posted 04-04-2012 05:39 AM

Your welcome, anytime

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1577 days


#12 posted 04-05-2012 03:38 PM

Eliminate as much dust in the environment as possible. A spray booth can be as simple as some plastic sheeting such as vapor barrier hung around the area you will be using. It can even be hung up and taken down as needed. If at all possible, do not have a heating vent or return inside the area, and ger a recirculating air filter that has a sub micron filter and run it for an hour or more before doing any finishing, then shut it off to prevent drafts during the finishing. Wear clean work clothes and keep them that way. Don’t stop on the way to check the table saw or whatever. Wipe down the work with tack rags before taking it into the finishing area, and again before starting the finishing process. This applies whether you spray or brush or wipe on the finish of your choice. The idea is to keep as much dust as humanly possible away from wet finish. Don’t forget that dust can get into open cans. If you must keep a can open for any length of time, putting a clean piece of lint free material over the can to keep it contaminant free.

I can’t add much to what the others have said here about the finishes and techniques, just wanted to stress cleanliness as job one. Only other thing I can offer is, cheap finishes are never cheap if they wreck your project. Buy as good as you can afford, and no more than you will use in a reasonable time. Quality finishes that are stale are as bad as cheap stuff.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View AAWW2005's profile

AAWW2005

100 posts in 1639 days


#13 posted 04-05-2012 11:19 PM

Hey guys, thanks for all the info! I found Minwax Brush on Laquer does exactly what I was looking for. After playing with some test pieces, I applied it to one of my displays and it turned out awsome!

-- "Your Design or Mine!"

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